The Psychobiology of Behavioral Development

Hardcover | December 1, 1993

byRonald Gandelman

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Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this textbook explores both the psychological and biological influences on the development of behavior, using data from both animal and human subjects to support principles and hypotheses. The arrangement of the book is bothchronological and topical, commencing with embryonic behavior and the influence of prenatal exposure to hormones and teratological agents and moving on to postnatal maternal influences and early stimulation. Play, learning and memory, and finally weaning and puberty complete this volume. This comprehensive work provides a history of this subdiscipline from the earliest research of Wilhelm Preyer in 1885 to the most recent findings on the psychobiology of behavioral development.

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Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this textbook explores both the psychological and biological influences on the development of behavior, using data from both animal and human subjects to support principles and hypotheses. The arrangement of the book is bothchronological and topical, commencing with embryonic b...

Ronald Gandelman, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at Rutgers University. His research focuses on the influence of hormones on behavioral development.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 6.3 × 9.57 × 1.06 inPublished:December 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195039416

ISBN - 13:9780195039412

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Table of Contents

1. Origin and Function of Embryonic Behavior2. Early Modification of Behavioral Development3. Hormones4. Some Threats to Development5. Postnatal Maternal Influences6. Early Stimulation7. Play8. Learning and Memory9. Transitions: Weaning and Puberty