The Public Prints: The Newspaper in Anglo-American Culture, 1665-1740 by Charles E. ClarkThe Public Prints: The Newspaper in Anglo-American Culture, 1665-1740 by Charles E. Clark

The Public Prints: The Newspaper in Anglo-American Culture, 1665-1740

byCharles E. Clark

Hardcover | March 1, 1995

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The Public Prints is the first comprehensive study of the role of the earliest American newspapers in the society and culture of the eighteenth century. In the hands of Charles E. Clark, American newspaper publishing becomes a branch of the English world of print in a story that begins in thebustling streets of late seventeenth-century London and moves to the provincial towns of England and across the Atlantic. While Clark's most detailed attention in America is to the three multi-newspaper towns of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, evidence from Williamsburg, Charleston, and Barbadosalso contributes to generalizations about the craft and business of eighteenth-century publishing. Stressing continuing trans-Atlantic connections as well as English origins, Clark argues that the newspapers were a force both for "anglicization" in their attempts to replicate English culture inAmerica and for "Americanization" in creating a fuller awareness of the British-American experience across colonial boundaries. He suggests, finally, that the newspapers' greatest cultural role in provincial America was the creation of a community bound by the celebration of common values andattachments through the shared ritual of reading.
Charles E. Clark is at University of New Hampshire.
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Title:The Public Prints: The Newspaper in Anglo-American Culture, 1665-1740Format:HardcoverDimensions:344 pages, 9.49 × 6.38 × 0.94 inPublished:March 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195082338

ISBN - 13:9780195082333

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Reviews

From Our Editors

Newspapers reflect the world as perceived by its writers and readers. They illustrate assumptions in a society about the nature of news and history, the practice of certain literary styles, the political and commercial structure of communities, and the larger process by which culture is transmitted and transformed. Comprehensive in scope and narrative in style, The Public Prints is the first study of the role of the earliest newspapers in eighteenth-century American society and culture. In the hands of Charles E. Clark, American newspaper publishing becomes a branch of the English world of print in a story that begins in the bustling streets of late-seventeenth-century London and moves to the provincial towns of England and across the Atlantic. While Clark's most detailed attention in America is to the three multi-newspaper towns of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, evidence from Williamsburg, Charleston, and Barbados also contributes to generalizations about the craft and business of eighteenth-century publishing. With the newspaper, Clark finds, English-speaki

Editorial Reviews

"[An] extensively researched book....A carefully researched and well-written study...should be of interest to both general readers and more specialized scholars. For library historians, Clark offers an understanding of what is probably the most important reading material for most colonialAmericans outside of the Bible and the almanac. For students of U.S. history, Clark's work provides insights into the place of the newspaper in colonial culture and how it developed its important role as primary disseminator of essential political information."--Library and Culture