The Quakers in English Society, 1655-1725

Hardcover | February 17, 2000

byAdrian Davies

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The early Quakers denounced the clergy and social elite but how did that affect Friends' relationships with others? Drawing upon the insights of sociologists and anthropologists, this lively and original study sets out to discover the social consequences of religious belief. Why did the sectappoint its own midwives to attend Quaker women during confinement? Was animosity to Quakerism so great that Friends were excluded from involvement in parish life? And to what extent were the remarkably high literacy rates of Quakers attributable to the Quaker faith or wider social forces? Using a wide range of primary source material, this study demonstrates that Quakers were not the marginal and isolated people which contemporaries and historians often portrayed. Indeed the sect had a profound impact not only upon members but more widely by encouraging a greater tolerance ofdiversity in early modern society.

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The early Quakers denounced the clergy and social elite but how did that affect Friends' relationships with others? Drawing upon the insights of sociologists and anthropologists, this lively and original study sets out to discover the social consequences of religious belief. Why did the sectappoint its own midwives to attend Quaker wom...

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Format:HardcoverPublished:February 17, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198208200

ISBN - 13:9780198208204

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`This book represents a significant contribution to Quaker studies, since, for the first time, it offers a focused account of the willingness of the Friends to integrate themselves into civil society and its institutions... The thematic organization, with chronological change examined withinthemes, is highly effective... It resolves some long-standing puzzles in Quaker studies as well as posing some new challenges.'John Morrill, TLS