The Quiet Evolution: Power, Planning, And Profits In New York State by Michael HeimanThe Quiet Evolution: Power, Planning, And Profits In New York State by Michael Heiman

The Quiet Evolution: Power, Planning, And Profits In New York State

byMichael Heiman

Hardcover | August 1, 1988

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The Quiet Evolution refers to the profusion of American planning reform literature and practices dealing with local land-use control. As such, this work will be of paramount interest to planning students and practitioners, urban sociologists, political scientists, and georgraphers. Contributing to a new and exciting resurgence of critical social theory that examines popular attention to environmental quality, defense of residential districts, and other consumption issues, The Quiet Evolution will prove useful to social theorists in the field of sociology, geography, political science, and history.
Title:The Quiet Evolution: Power, Planning, And Profits In New York StateFormat:HardcoverDimensions:337 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:August 1, 1988Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275924769

ISBN - 13:9780275924768

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Editorial Reviews

"A valuable contribution to an emerging radical critique of liberal environmentalism. . . . [In] Keep Out: The Struggle for Land Use Control, Heiman opposes the reformist claim that lifting control of land use to regional or state levels can fairly accommodate competing demands for the use of land. For him, this belief overlooks contradictions between consumption and production, which are immune to evenhanded administrative control. With New York State as his laboratory, Heiman carefully shows how institutions such as the Regional Plan Association of New York, the Port Authority, and the Adirondack Park Agency reflect capitalist backing for private and public regional planning and create resistance movements among local consumer and producer interests. . . . [The] theoretical and empirical analysis here demand attention, and this book belongs in graduate collections in planning and environmental studies."-Choice