The Quotidian Revolution: Vernacularization, Religion, and the Premodern Public Sphere in India by Christian Lee Novetzke

The Quotidian Revolution: Vernacularization, Religion, and the Premodern Public Sphere in India

byChristian Lee Novetzke

Hardcover | October 18, 2016

not yet rated|write a review

Pricing and Purchase Info

$84.77 online 
$85.00
Earn 424 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In thirteenth-century Maharashtra, a new vernacular literature emerged to challenge the hegemony of Sanskrit, a language largely restricted to men of high caste. In a vivid and accessible idiom, this new Marathi literature inaugurated a public debate over the ethics of social difference grounded in the idiom of everyday life. The arguments of vernacular intellectuals pushed the question of social inclusion into ever-wider social realms, spearheading the development of a nascent premodern public sphere that valorized the quotidian world in sociopolitical terms.

The Quotidian Revolution examines this pivotal moment of vernacularization in Indian literature, religion, and public life by investigating courtly donative Marathi inscriptions alongside the first extant texts of Marathi literature: the Lilacaritra (1278) and the Jñanesvari (1290). Novetzke revisits the influence of Chakradhar (c. 1194), the founder of the Mahanubhav religion, and Jnandev (c. 1271), who became a major figure of the Varkari religion, to observe how these avant-garde and worldly elites pursued a radical intervention into the social questions and ethics of the age. Drawing on political anthropology and contemporary theories of social justice, religion, and the public sphere, The Quotidian Revolution explores the specific circumstances of this new discourse oriented around everyday life and its lasting legacy: widening the space of public debate in a way that presages key aspects of Indian modernity and democracy.

About The Author

Christian Lee Novetzke is professor of religious studies, South Asia studies, and global studies at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory: A Cultural History of Saint Namdev in India (Columbia, 2008) and coauthor, with William Elison and Andy Rotman,...
Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, And The Nation
Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, And The Nation

by William Elison

$58.50$60.50

Ships within 3-5 weeks

Not available in stores

Details & Specs

Title:The Quotidian Revolution: Vernacularization, Religion, and the Premodern Public Sphere in IndiaFormat:HardcoverDimensions:432 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.03 inPublished:October 18, 2016Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231175809

ISBN - 13:9780231175807

Customer Reviews of The Quotidian Revolution: Vernacularization, Religion, and the Premodern Public Sphere in India

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Preface: The Shape of the BookAcknowledgmentsNote on Translation, Transliteration, and AbbreviationsIntroduction: The Argument of the BookPart One1. The Yadava Century2. Traces of a Medieval Public3. Two Biographies of Literary VernacularizationPart Two4. The Vernacular Moment5. The Mahanubhav EthicPart Three6. A Vernacular Manifesto7. Sonic EqualityConclusion: The Vernacular Millennium and the Quotidian RevolutionNotesGlossaryBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

Novetzke demonstrates the circumstances that enabled a vigorous, innovative, often irreverent set of Marathi texts describing and discussing the lives and experiences of ordinary men and women to burst forth in the second half of the thirteenth century. In his expert hands, this quotidian revolution of the literary imagination comes to life in an account that is deeply embedded in original textual and historical scholarship but also enlivened and illuminated by an impressive range of contemporary social theory.