The Rage Of A Privileged Class: Why Do Prosperouse Blacks Still Have the Blues? by Ellis Cose

The Rage Of A Privileged Class: Why Do Prosperouse Blacks Still Have the Blues?

byEllis Cose

Paperback | December 2, 1994

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A controversial and widely heralded look at the race-related pain and anger felt by the most respected, best educated, and wealthiest members of the black community.

About The Author

A controversial and widely heralded look at the race-related pain and anger felt by the most respected, best educated, and wealthiest members of the black community.
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Details & Specs

Title:The Rage Of A Privileged Class: Why Do Prosperouse Blacks Still Have the Blues?Format:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.47 inPublished:December 2, 1994Publisher:HarperCollins

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0060925949

ISBN - 13:9780060925949

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A controversial and widely heralded look at the race-related pain and anger felt by the most respected, best educated, and wealthiest members of the black community--"a disciplined, graceful exposition of a neglected aspect of the subject of race in America".--New York Times Book Review

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"A disciplined, graceful exposition of a neglected aspect of the subject of race in America." (New York Times Book Review)