The Relevance of Philosophy to Life by John LachsThe Relevance of Philosophy to Life by John Lachs

The Relevance of Philosophy to Life

byJohn Lachs

Hardcover | April 15, 1995

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With The Relevance of Philosophy to Life, eminent American philosopher John Lachs reminds us that philosophy is not merely a remote subject of academic research and discourse, but an ever-changing field which can help us navigate through some of the chaos of late twentieth-century living. It provides a clear-eyed look at important philosophical issues--the primacy of values, rationality and irrationality, society and its discontents, life and death, and the traits of human nature--as related to the human condition in the modern world.
Title:The Relevance of Philosophy to LifeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:April 15, 1995Publisher:Vanderbilt University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0826512623

ISBN - 13:9780826512628

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The primary purpose of philosophy is to help us better understand the critical issues in life. Sadly, in this modern world we often relegate philosophy to the ivory tower and to dusty tomes forgotten on the library shelf. With The Relevance of Philosophy to Life, eminent American philosopher John Lachs reminds us that philosophy is not merely a remote subject of academic research and discourse, but an ever-changing field which can help us navigate through some of the chaos of late twentieth-century living. Utilizing an American pragmatism grounded in the works of Dewey, James, and Santayana, Lachs insists on both the personal and the social significance of philosophy. Tackling controversial topics such as dogmatism, the relativity of values, resuscitation, euthanasia, the right to die, violence, education, technological advancement and dominance, and individual integrity in bureaucratic structures, Lachs argues that value is relative to human nature and that human nature is not one but many "human natures". He sheds light on complicated issues in a way that inform