The Religious Question In Modern China

Paperback | October 22, 2012

byVincent Goossaert, David A. Palmer

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Recent events—from strife in Tibet and the rapid growth of Christianity in China to the spectacular expansion of Chinese Buddhist organizations around the globe—vividly demonstrate that one cannot understand the modern Chinese world without attending closely to the question of religion. The Religious Question in Modern China highlights parallels and contrasts between historical events, political regimes, and cultural movements to explore how religion has challenged and responded to secular Chinese modernity, from 1898 to the present.

Vincent Goossaert and David A. Palmer piece together the puzzle of religion in China not by looking separately at different religions in different contexts, but by writing a unified story of how religion has shaped, and in turn been shaped by, modern Chinese society. From Chinese medicine and the martial arts to communal temple cults and revivalist redemptive societies, the authors demonstrate that from the nineteenth century onward, as the Chinese state shifted, the religious landscape consistently resurfaced in a bewildering variety of old and new forms. The Religious Question in Modern China integrates historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives in a comprehensive overview of China’s religious history that is certain to become an indispensible reference for specialists and students alike.

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Recent events—from strife in Tibet and the rapid growth of Christianity in China to the spectacular expansion of Chinese Buddhist organizations around the globe—vividly demonstrate that one cannot understand the modern Chinese world without attending closely to the question of religion. The Religious Question in Modern China highlights...

Vincent Goossaert is deputy director of the Groupe Sociétés, Religions, Laïcités at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris. He is the author of The Taoists of Peking, 1800–1949: A Social History of Urban Clerics, among other books. David A. Palmer is assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University ...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:480 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.2 inPublished:October 22, 2012Publisher:University Of Chicago PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:022600533X

ISBN - 13:9780226005331

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

A Note on Translations, Character Sets, and Abbreviations

Introduction

PART I     Religions and Revolutions

1. The Late Qing Religious Landscape   

2. Ideology, Religion, and the Construction of a Modern State, 1898–1937    

3. Model Religions for a Modern China: Christianity, Buddhism, and Religious Citizenship    

4. Cultural Revitalization: Redemptive Societies and Secularized Traditions    

5. Rural Resistance and Adaptation, 1898–1949    

6. The CCP and Religion, 1921–66    

7. Spiritual Civilization and Political Utopianism    

PART II     Multiple Religious Modernities: Into the Twenty-First Century

8. Alternative Trajectories for Religion in the Chinese World    

9. Filial Piety, the Family, and Death    

10. Revivals of Communal Religion in the Later Twentieth Century    

11. The Evolution of Modern Religiosities    

12. Official Discourses and Institutions of Religion    

13. Global Religions, Ethnic Identities, and Geopolitics    

Conclusion

Bibliography

     Index

Editorial Reviews

“Goossaert and Palmer give us a holistic, comprehensive analysis of the religious system in modern China, along with the trajectory of religion-modernity-secularism. . . . With its broad scope and comprehensive analysis, [The Religious Question in Modern China] is especially inspiring to scholars based in mainland China. The socio-historical approach is highly appreciated.”