The Return of the Armadas: The Last Years of the Elizabethan War against Spain 1595-1603 by R. B. WernhamThe Return of the Armadas: The Last Years of the Elizabethan War against Spain 1595-1603 by R. B. Wernham

The Return of the Armadas: The Last Years of the Elizabethan War against Spain 1595-1603

byR. B. Wernham

Hardcover | November 1, 1990

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The defeat of the Spanish Armada did not put an end to Spanish sea power, nor to Spain's ambitions in northern Europe. By the mid-1590s Spain had recovered from the disaster of 1588, and the renewed naval wars together with the outbreak of rebellion in Ireland from the principal themes ofthis book. R B Wernham sets out to examine these major events of the last years of the Queen Elizabeth's reign and to assess their impact on English policy. Professor Wernham shows how much of the impetus in foreign policy derived from the Earl of Essex, whose personal ambition and practical incompetence brought frustration and danger, and ultimately led him through rebellion to the Scaffold. It was left to Mountjoy in Ireland, to Leveson and a newgeneration of sea commanders, and above all to Robert Cecil, to bring war and rebellion to a reasonably satisfactory conclusion. The Return of the Armadas is a superbly integrated and lucidly written study in grand strategy by a leading historian of Elizabethan affairs.
R. B. Wernham is Emeritus Professor of Modern History at University of Oxford.
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Title:The Return of the Armadas: The Last Years of the Elizabethan War against Spain 1595-1603Format:HardcoverDimensions:466 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.26 inPublished:November 1, 1990Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198204434

ISBN - 13:9780198204435

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`This is an intelligent and well-documented telling, in which the author weaves together matters of obvious and peripheral diplomatic concern, res gestae, and individual personality and agency.'Paul A. Fideler, Lesley College, The Historian