The Rich Get Richer And The Poor Get Prison: A Reader

Paperback | August 1, 2010

byJeffrey Reiman, Paul Leighton

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The Rich get Richer and the Poor get Prison: A Reader is a selection of 25 articles ranging from newspaper stories that highlight issues to articles in professional journals. Articles cover the following topics:

    Crime Control in America

    A Crime by Any other Name...

    ...and the Poor get Prison

    To the Vanquished belong the Spoils

    Criminal Justice or Criminal  Justice

 

Professors who use the best-selling book written by Reiman and Leighton, The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison , now in a ninth edition,  have frequently asked for a reader. Where appropriate, articles have been edited to highlight the parts most relevant for the thesis of The Rich Get Richer.

 

This book of readings can be used stand-alone, or as an accompaniment to the main text. 

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From the Publisher

The Rich get Richer and the Poor get Prison: A Reader is a selection of 25 articles ranging from newspaper stories that highlight issues to articles in professional journals. Articles cover the following topics:     Crime Control in America     A Crime by Any other Name...     ...and the Poor get Prison     To the Vanquished belon...

From the Jacket

The Rich get Richer and the Poor get Prison: A Readeris a selection of 25 articles ranging from newspaper stories that highlight issues to articles in professional journals. Articles cover the following topics:    Crime Control in America    A Crime by Any other Name...    ...and the Poor get Prison    To the Vanquished belong the Spoi...

Jeffrey Reiman is the William Fraser McDowell Professor of Philosophy at American University in Washington, D.C. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1942. He received his B.A. in philosophy from Queens College in 1963, and his Ph.D. in philosophy from Pennsylvania State University in 1968. He was a Fulbright Scholar in India dur...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:176 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.45 inPublished:August 1, 2010Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0205661793

ISBN - 13:9780205661794

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Chapter 1: Crime Control in America

Editors’ introduction

Albert Blumstein,  Why Is Crime Falling — Or Is It?

Michael A. Fletcher, High Incarceration Rate May Fuel Community Crime

Charles Terry, From C-Block to Academia: You Can’t Get There From Here

Jamison Colburn, A New Suit by Farmers Against the DEA Illustrates Why the War on Drugs Should Not Include a War on Hemp

 

Chapter 2: A Crime by Any Other Name…

Editors’ introduction

David Barstow, When Workers Die: U.S. Rarely Seeks Charges for Death in Workplace

Anthony J. Sebok, The U.K.'s ‘Corporate Manslaughter’ Statute: British Versus American Approaches to Making Firms Responsible for Deaths Resulting from Gross Negligence

Atul Gawande, The Checklist

David Michaels, Popcorn Lung Coming to Your Kitchen? The FDA Doesn’t Want to Know

David Barboza, Death Sentences in Chinese Milk Case

David Barboza, Ex-Chief of China Food and Drug Unit Sentenced to Death for Graft

 

Chapter 3:  …and the Poor Get Prison

Editors’ introduction

Devah Pager and Bruce Western, Race at Work: Realities of Race and Criminal Record in the New York City Job Market

David A. Harris, Why It Matters: The Connection Of ‘Driving While Black’ To Other Issues Of Criminal Justice And Race

Adam Liptak, Illegal Globally, Bail for Profit Remains in U.S.

Paul Leighton Ebbers, 25 Year Sentence for WorldCom Fraud Upheld. Good.

Barry Ritholtz,  A Memo Found in the Street: Uncle Sam The Enabler

Transcript of This American Life,  The Giant Pool of Money

Matt Apuzzo, They Warned Us: US was told to 'expect foreclosures, expect horror stories'

 

Chapter 4: To the Vanquished Belong the Spoils

Editors’ introduction

Glenn C. Loury, Why Are So Many Americans in Prison?

Jeffrey Reiman, The Moral Ambivalence of Crime in an Unjust Society

Paul Butler, Much Respect: Toward a Hip-Hop Theory of Punishment

Robert Johnson, Wheel of Torture

 

Conclusion:  Criminal Justice or Criminal Justice

Editors’ introduction

Alfred Blumstein and Alex Piquero, Restore Rationality to Sentencing Policy

John Braithwaite, Encourage Restorative Justice

Francis Cullen, Make Rehabilitation Corrections’ Guiding Paradigm

Brandon Welsh and David Farrington, Save Children from a Life of Crime