The Right to Religious Freedom in International Law: Between group rights and individual rights by Anat ScolnicovThe Right to Religious Freedom in International Law: Between group rights and individual rights by Anat Scolnicov

The Right to Religious Freedom in International Law: Between group rights and individual rights

byAnat ScolnicovEditorAnat Scolnicov

Hardcover | December 1, 2010

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This book analyses the right to religious freedom within international law. Analysing legal structures in a variety of both Western and non-Western jurisdictions, the book sets out a topography of the different constitutional structures of religion within the state and their compliance with international human rights law. The book also considers the position of women's religious freedom vis a vis community claims of religious freedom. Taking a rigorous approach to the right, Anat Scolnicov argues that the interpretation and application of religious freedom must be understood as a conflict between individual and group claims of rights, and argues for an individualistic interpretation of this right.

Anat Scolnicov is the Director of studies and a College Lecturer in Law at Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, UK.
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Title:The Right to Religious Freedom in International Law: Between group rights and individual rightsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:280 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.98 inPublished:December 1, 2010Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415481147

ISBN - 13:9780415481144

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Table of Contents

1. Existing Protection of Religious Freedom in International Law  2. Why is there a Right to Freedom of Religion?  3. The Legal Status of Religion in the State  4. Women and Religious Freedom  5. Children, Education and Religious Freedom  6. Religious Freedom as a Right of Free Speech  7. Conclusion