The Rise and Fall of the Healthy Factory: The Politics of Industrial Health in Britain, 1914-60

Hardcover | December 8, 2010

byV. Long

not yet rated|write a review
This the first account of the emergence and demise of preventive health care for workers. It explores how trade unions, employers, doctors and the government reconfigured the relationship between health, productivity and the factory over the course of the twentieth century within a broader political, industrial and social context.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$166.50

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

This the first account of the emergence and demise of preventive health care for workers. It explores how trade unions, employers, doctors and the government reconfigured the relationship between health, productivity and the factory over the course of the twentieth century within a broader political, industrial and social context.

VICKY LONG Lecturer in British History at Northumbria University, UK.

other books by V. Long

The Key Muscles of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume I
The Key Muscles of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume I

Paperback|Nov 1 2009

$32.06$41.95list pricesave 23%
The Key Poses of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume II
The Key Poses of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume II

Paperback|Nov 1 2009

$32.95$41.95list pricesave 21%
Strategic Compensation In Canada
Strategic Compensation In Canada

Paperback|Oct 21 2013

$131.10$148.95list pricesave 11%
see all books by V. Long
Format:HardcoverDimensions:296 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:December 8, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230283713

ISBN - 13:9780230283718

Customer Reviews of The Rise and Fall of the Healthy Factory: The Politics of Industrial Health in Britain, 1914-60

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction
War and Industrial Health: the Productive Alliance
The Rise of the Healthy Factory
Taking Responsibility: the Politics of Industrial Health
Tailoring Provisions for Individualised Needs
A National Industrial Health Service?
The Fall of the Healthy Factory
Conclusion