The Role of Art in the Late Anglo-Saxon Church by Richard Gameson

The Role of Art in the Late Anglo-Saxon Church

byRichard Gameson

Hardcover | June 1, 1995

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This study explores the role of early medieval religious art in its historical context, focusing on England from the reign of Alfred the Great to the aftermath of the Norman conquest. Tenth and eleventh century society expressed itself extensively through visual means, and the survivingmaterial provides a rich body of evidence for the religious culture of the time. Combining visual and documentary evidence, The Role of Art in the Late Anglo-Saxon Church sheds new light on a wide range of magnificent art works and their functions, and offers fresh perspectives on theecclesiastical history and beliefs of late Anglo Saxon England, with important implications for the study of early medieval civilization in general.

About The Author

Richard Gameson is a Lecturer in Medieval History at University of Kent.

Details & Specs

Title:The Role of Art in the Late Anglo-Saxon ChurchFormat:HardcoverDimensions:326 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.98 inPublished:June 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198205414

ISBN - 13:9780198205418

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`a strikingly original contribution ... The book functions as both a refresher course and an eye-opener ... a book which is produced as thoughtfully, as it is written ... The author draws upon a wide range of comparative material, Continental and Byzantine, and the footnotes are rich inreferences. The effect of a steady and probing intelligence asking repeated questions of the same objects is to bring them into a more complete light than has heretofore been the case. That a multitude of new questions will now crop up is the greatest testimony to the value of this consistentlyimpressive monograph.'Richard W. Pfaff, Uiversity of North Carolina, Church History, Dec 1996