The Role of the Reader: Explorations In The Semiotics Of Texts by Umberto EcoThe Role of the Reader: Explorations In The Semiotics Of Texts by Umberto Eco

The Role of the Reader: Explorations In The Semiotics Of Texts

byUmberto Eco

Paperback | July 22, 1979

Pricing and Purchase Info

$33.27

Earn 166 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

"... not merely interesting and novel, but also exceedingly provocative and heuristically fertile." -The Review of Metaphysics

"... essential reading for anyone interesting in... the new reader-centered forms of criticism." -Library Journal

In this erudite and imaginative book, Umberto Eco sets forth a dialectic between 'open' and 'closed' texts.

First a semiotician at the University of Bologna, and a leading figure in contemporary Italian culture, Eco brought semiotics to fiction in his first novel, The Name of the Rose (1980). This unexpected international best-seller employs the techniques of a detective novel along with sophisticated postmodern narrative and verbal conundru...
Loading
Title:The Role of the Reader: Explorations In The Semiotics Of TextsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:July 22, 1979Publisher:Indiana University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:025320318X

ISBN - 13:9780253203182

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction: The Role of the Reader

I. Open
1. The Poetics of the Open Work
2. The Semantics of Metaphor
3. On the Possibility of Generating Aesthetic Messages in an Edenic Language

II. Closed
4. The Myth of Superman
5. Rhetoric and Ideology in Sue's Les Mysteres de Paris
6. Narrative Structures in Fleming

III. Open/Closed
7. Peirce and the Semiotic Foundations of Openness: Signs as Texts and Texts as Signs
8. Lector in Fabula: Pragmatic Strategy in a Metanarrative Text

Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Bibliography

From Our Editors

In this collection of nine essays, Umberto Eco sets forth a dialectic between 'open' and 'closed' texts, between a work of art that actively involves the 'addressee' in its production and one that holds the 'addressee' at bay and seeks to evoke a limited and predetermined response. He investigates the contributions of contemporary semantics to the study of narrative, and connects the modalities of textual interpretation with the problem of possible worlds.