The Roman And The Teuton; A Series Of Lectures Delivered Before The University Of Cambridge by Charles KingsleyThe Roman And The Teuton; A Series Of Lectures Delivered Before The University Of Cambridge by Charles Kingsley

The Roman And The Teuton; A Series Of Lectures Delivered Before The University Of Cambridge

byCharles Kingsley

Paperback | October 12, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ...answered the king as Cassius did, when falsely accused of conspiring by Caligula: 'If I had known of it, you should not." One knows not whether Dietrich ever saw those words: but they prove at least that all his confidence, justice, kindness, to the patrician philosopher, had not won him from the pardonable conceit about the Romani nominis umbram. Boethius' story is most probably true. One cannot think that that man would die with a lie in his mouth. One cannot pass by, as the utterances of a deliberate hypocrisy, those touching appeals to his guiding mistress, that heavenly wisdom who has led him so long upon the paths of truth and virtue, and who seems to him, in his miserable cell, to have betrayed him in his hour of need. Heaven forbid. Better to believe that Dietrich committed once in his life, a fearful crime, than that good Boethius' famous book is such another as the Eikon Basilike. Boethius, again, says that the Gothic courtiers hated him, and suborned branded scoundrels to swear away his life and that of the senate, because he had opposed 'the hounds of the palace,' Amigast, Trigulla, and other greedy barbarians. There was, of course, a Gothic party and a Roman party about the court; and each hated the other bitterly. Dietrich had favoured the Romans. But the Goths could not have seen such men as Symmachus and Boethius the confidants and counsellors of the Amal, without longing for their downfall; and if, as Boethius and the Catholic historians say, the whole tragedy arose out of a Gothic plot to destroy the Roman party, such things have happened but too often in the world's history. The only facts which make against the story are, that Cyprianus the accuser was a Roman, and that Cassiodorus, who must have belonged to the Roman...
Title:The Roman And The Teuton; A Series Of Lectures Delivered Before The University Of CambridgeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:86 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.18 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217284930

ISBN - 13:9780217284936

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