The Runner's Guide To Yoga: A Practical Approach To Building Strength And Flexibility For Better Running by Sage RountreeThe Runner's Guide To Yoga: A Practical Approach To Building Strength And Flexibility For Better Running by Sage Rountree

The Runner's Guide To Yoga: A Practical Approach To Building Strength And Flexibility For Better…

bySage Rountree

Paperback | April 1, 2012

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Yoga will make you a better runner.Millions of runners practice yoga daily because it cuts injuries and leads to more fluid, enjoyable running. InThe Runner's Guide to Yoga, Sage Rountree--America's leading expert on yoga for athletes--shows you the poses and practices for stronger, healthier running.Filled with color photographs, clear instruction, and easy-to-follow routines,The Runner's Guide to Yogaoffers simple ways to make yoga a part of your everyday training, even if you have never set foot in a yoga studio. This practical guide highlights the routines that ease tightness in the hamstrings and hips, strengthen the core, build strength and flexibility throughout your body, and speed recovery from minor injuries.Rountree highlights over 100 key poses modeled by real runners and includes focused routines as well as key pre- and post-race yoga sequences.The Runner's Guide to Yogawill complement your running every day, all season long.Discover how yoga can improve your running with
  • Dynamic warm-ups and cooldowns for your workouts
  • Poses that target typical trouble spots, such as hips, calves, and hamstrings
  • Self-tests to determine areas of weakness or imbalance
  • Breath and meditation exercises to sharpen mental focus

Sage Rountree is America's leading expert on yoga for athletes.She is a certified endurance sports coach as well as an Experienced Registered Yoga Teacher with the Yoga Alliance. She is a featured instructor at Kripalu and offers yoga workshops for athletes and coaches around the country as well as at Carolina Yoga Company, a yoga stud...
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Title:The Runner's Guide To Yoga: A Practical Approach To Building Strength And Flexibility For Better…Format:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 9.28 × 7.08 × 0.65 inPublished:April 1, 2012Publisher:VeloPressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1934030848

ISBN - 13:9781934030844

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic Read This is an excellent book. It will open your eyes on different aspects of sports, training and genetics. It touches on how one can practice (10.000 hour rule), how countries select athletes and the differences of how genetics/geography play in performance.
Date published: 2017-12-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Smart and stimulating Factual story telling that keeps you awake until 5am because you can't put the book down. Don't let the title fool you, this book is not just a read for people who are athletic or who enjoy sports. It is an interesting and insightful read for all that I highly recommend.
Date published: 2017-02-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Insightful This is a great book for any sports fan, but really hit me hard was the section on early specialization in youth sports. I know so many parents, myself included, who have pushed their kids into sports early in life and the knowledge shared here really altered my ideas about it. Worth the read.
Date published: 2017-01-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating Look into Sports and Genes! Fascinating look into the nature versus nurture argument in the production of elite athletes. Yes, passion for a sport, conducive local environment plus the 10,000 hours of practice rule help in athletic excellence but genetics and body-types are key to becoming an elite athlete. Enjoyable quick read. This book could easily have been expanded to include more insights into soccer and F1 racers fitness and genetic uniqueness.
Date published: 2015-08-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A look at nature and nurture applied to sports Contrary to the title, there isn't one gene that makes you great at all sports, but there are genes that can make you better at specific sports. So really, this is a book that goes over the genetics of successful people in every sport, from sprinting to dog sledding. With that said, it isn't a book that says only genes matter, it also looks in how the way Kenyans grow up and the opportunity of distance running plays into their success at that sport. Overall it seems to be a balanced picture at what makes successful athletes. I enjoyed it quite a bit.
Date published: 2015-03-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating! An excellent response to the 10,000 hr rule from the outliers. An interesting read for anyone interested in what it takes to be at the top of their sport. Great research , well written.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating, even for casual athletes If you're even a casual athlete or weekend warrior, you'll be fascinated by this study of how different athletes of varying backgrounds and echelons of performance respond to different types of training. There's a lot more to Kenyan running success than altitude, for example, but altitude training does help, and it helps some Kenyan runners far more than others. The book surfaces big questions like, what's professional sport supposed to do with people whose natural physiology trips blood-doping tests? Human beings are really, really complex organisms, and sport pushes our limits in really interesting ways. I still think about this book when I'm out for a run.
Date published: 2014-11-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Sports Gene Insightful. I'll never look at training the same way again.
Date published: 2014-08-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Sports Gene. Will Written and well Researched. Learned a lot of insight into not only Athletes but groups of people. Highly Recommend this Book!
Date published: 2014-08-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for coaches Incredibly well researched book, and thoroughly enjoyable to read. It had me rethinking much of what I had previously thought concerning what it takes to be a good athlete
Date published: 2014-07-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really fascinating read I really enjoyed this book. Doing it all fascinating... Love the genetics aspect, but also the research that it backs it up.
Date published: 2014-02-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Analyst This book opened my mind to the complicated interplay genetics have in sports. It challenges stereotyping and generalizing, and ultimately the bias we bring into our understanding of people and their abilities. The book is nuanced, which is a fair way to assess the topic.
Date published: 2014-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sports Gene Great book. Highly interesting and thought provoking. A must read for anyone interested in the Science of Sport
Date published: 2013-09-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Brief Summary and Review *A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20, 2013. What does it take to become an elite athlete? The intuitive answer for most of us is that it probably takes some lucky genes on the one hand, and a whole heck of a lot of hard work on the other. Specifically, that we may need to be blessed with a particular body type to excel at a particular sport or discipline (after all, elite marathon runners tend to look far different from elite NFL running backs, who in turn tend to look far different from elite swimmers), but that beyond this it is practice and diligence that paves the way to success. When we look at the science, though--as sports writer David Epstein does in his new book The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance--we find that the story is much more complicated than this. In general terms we find that nature and nurture interact at every step of the way in the development of an elite athlete, and that biology plays far more of a role (and in far more ways) than we may have expected. To begin with, when it comes to physiology, we find that biology does indeed have a large role to play in influencing our height and skeletal structure (as we would expect), but that biology also influences physiology in many other ways that are important when it comes to elite sports. For example, we find that people naturally vary widely in all of the following ways: the size of our heart and lungs, and the amount of red blood cells and hemoglobin that pumps through our veins; the specific type of muscle fibers that are most prevalent in our bodies (and the specific number of each); as well as our visual acuity--and again, all of these factors play a significant role in determining just how athletic we will be (and in what sports we will excel). Second, when it comes to training, we find that hard work is not all there is to it. For biology not only shapes our physiology, but also how our physiology responds to training (including how much muscle mass and aerobic capacity we are able to build through exercise). The fact is that we naturally vary widely in just how much we respond to exercise (to the point where some of us improve dramatically through exercise, whereas others of us respond hardly at all). And we also respond differently to different training regimens (to the point where a training regime that works for one person may in fact harm another). And while we may wish to take credit for just how hard we train, here too biology is found to play a role. For it turns out that we differ widely in just how naturally disposed we are to push ourselves. And over and above this, biology also influences how much we experience pain, such that even among those who experience the same desire to push themselves (both in training and in competition), one may find it much easier to handle the pain involved than the other--which, of course, can have a big impact on results. And speaking of pain, our biology even influences how easily we injure and how well we recover from our injuries--which, once again, has a significant impact on performance. As an added bonus, Epstein not only covers which biological factors have an impact on sports performance, but the evolutionary story of these biological factors (including why different populations that have adapted to different environments have come to acquire traits that make them well-disposed to different sports and disciplines [for example, why many elite marathoners have origins in East Africa, many elite sprinters have origins in West Africa, and many elite swimmers and weight-lifters have origins in Europe]). In short, then, biology plays much more of a role in elite athletic performance that we may have realized. Not that the point of the book is to say that athletic performance is all in our genes. Just the contrary, as mentioned above the book makes the point that genes always interact with the environment to produce athletic outcomes. Genes are essential in shaping the athlete, but just as essential is the athlete's upbringing and culture, and that they do in fact get the training that is needed to make the most of their natural talents. This book is a triumph. I can't imagine it would be possible to cover the topic better than the author has. The science involved is thoroughly researched; the anecdotes are perfectly chosen and add both context and interest (many of them are downright inspirational); and it is all presented in a very clear and thoroughly enjoyable way. Well done Mr. Epstein. A full executive summary of the book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20; a podcast discussion of the book will be available shortly thereafter.
Date published: 2013-08-13

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I. Overview: How Yoga Helps Runners
Chapter 1. Strength and Flexibility
Chapter 2. Balance
Chapter 3. Focus

Part II. Poses for Strength and Flexibility
Chapter 4. Hips and Thighs
Chapter 5. Core
Chapter 6. Lower Legs
Chapter 7. Upper Body

Part III. Finding the Right Balance

Chapter 8. Preventing and Correcting Overuse Injury
Chapter 9. Preventing Acute Injury
Chapter 10. Balancing Work and Rest
Chapter 11. Balancing Studio Yoga with Home Practice

Part IV. Exercises for Focus

Chapter 12. Yoga's Eight-Limbed Approach
Chapter 13. Breath Exercises
Chapter 14. Meditation Exercises

Part V. Putting It Together

Chapter 15. Routines for Dynamic Warm-up Before a Run
Chapter 16. Routines for Practice During a Run
Chapter 17. Routines Following an Easy Run
Chapter 18. Routines Following a Hard Run or Race

Recommended Resources
Subject Index
Poses Index
About the Models
About the Author

Editorial Reviews

"Endurance athletes generally have poor flexibility, core strength, balance, and posture. Improving these can really change performance for the better. The Athlete’s Guide to Yoga is a great resource to get you on the path to better training and racing." —Joe Friel, founder of Joe Friel's Ultrafit and author of The Triathlete's Training Bible, The Cyclist's Training Bible, and The Mountain Biker's Training Bible "After running and racing for nearly thirty years, competing through five Olympic trials and the 1996 Olympics, and traveling the world on U.S. track, road, and cross-country teams, I thought I knew all the tricks for success and longevity in distance running. Yoga helped me set a world age-group record in the indoor mile and an outdoor American record in the 1500m at age 45. Yoga should have been—and will be from here on out—added to the mix of ingredients for success for any serious endurance athlete. Incorporate the practice of yoga into your weekly training regimen, and it will make a difference in your life as an endurance athlete. I highly recommend The Athlete’s Guide to Yoga to all athletes who want to train smarter and race faster." —from the foreword by long-distance runner Joan Nesbit Mabe "Whether you're a yogini or you've never heard of downward-facing dog, you'll come away with something useful from The Athlete's Guide to Yoga." —Women's Adventure Magazine