The SAGES Manual of Strategic Decision Making: Case Studies in Minimal Access Surgery

Paperback | August 15, 2008

EditorCarol E.H. Scott-Conner, José E. Torres, Nate Thepjatri

not yet rated|write a review
Fifty scenarios in general surgery are described and possible treatment options are considered. A case presentation format is used to illustrate the author's preferred strategy, supported by evidence from the literature. Alternate approaches favored by other experts are also presented. An excellent clinical decision making tool for general surgeons and residents.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$114.32 online
$128.95 list price (save 11%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Fifty scenarios in general surgery are described and possible treatment options are considered. A case presentation format is used to illustrate the author's preferred strategy, supported by evidence from the literature. Alternate approaches favored by other experts are also presented. An excellent clinical decision making tool for gen...

From the Jacket

The SAGES Manual of Strategic Decision Making: Case Studies in Minimal Access Surgery is an excellent resource and clinical decision-making tool for general surgeons and residents. While other SAGES manuals simply discuss core topics in minimally-invasive surgery and GI endoscopy, this unique book explores fifty scenarios with a focus ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:656 pages, 7.99 × 5 × 0 inPublished:August 15, 2008Publisher:Springer New YorkLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0387766707

ISBN - 13:9780387766706

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The SAGES Manual of Strategic Decision Making: Case Studies in Minimal Access Surgery

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Access to the abdomen.- Appendicitis during pregnancy.- Stab wound to the abdomen.- Elective cholecystectomy.- Gallstone pancreatitis.- Cholelithiasis with choledocholithiasis.- Choice of approach for laparoscopic common duct exploration.- Bleeding after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.- Cystic duct stump leak after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.- Medical versus surgical management for uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease.- Partial or complete fundoplication for GERD.- Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasis.- Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the morbidly obese.- Achalasia of the esophagus.- Laparoscopic management of achalasia.- Preoperative staging for esophageal carcinoma.- Esophageal carcinoma.- Gastric carcinoma.- Feeding tube placement, gastrostomy versus jejunostomy.- Percutaneous versus laparoscopic feeding tube placement.- Bariatric surgery: choice of surgical procedure.- Bariatric surgery with incidental cholelithiasis.- Uncomplicated adhesive small bowel obstruction.- Possible appendicitis.- Acute (retrocecal) appendicitis.- Perforated appendicitis.- Large bowel obstruction due to carcinoma of the rectum.- Carcinoma of the cecum.- Carcinoma of the left colon.- Low anterior resection for carcinoma below the peritoneal reflection.- Splenectomy massive splenomegaly.- Insulinoma of tail pancreas.- Preoperative staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.- Living related donor nephrectomy, right side.- Adrenal incidentaloma.- Incidental adrenal mass with suspicious features.- Bilateral pheochromocytoma.- Indirect inguinal hernia.- Bilateral inguinal hernias.- Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.- Variceal bleeding.- Gastroesophageal reflux disease.- Screening colonoscopy: endoscopic or virtual.- Benign sessile right colon polyp.- Rectal villous adenoma.- Thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis: a lagnappe

Editorial Reviews

From the reviews:"This is a guide to clinical strategy for the general surgeon employing minimal access surgery. . Contemporary trainees in general surgery and senior practitioners . will benefit from this work from an international group of experts with a significant number of contributors from the University of Iowa. . Discussion of treatment alternatives is clear and the review of evidence is excellent. Dr. Scott-Conner and her contributors place an important technique in context for trainees and practitioners."(David J. Dries, Doody's Review Service, November, 2008)