The Scapegoat

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The Scapegoat

by Daphne Du Maurier

University Of Pennsylvania Press | February 27, 2000 | Trade Paperback

The Scapegoat is rated 4 out of 5 by 1.
"Someone jolted my elbow as I drank and said, 'Je vous demande pardon, ' and as I moved to give him space he turned and stared at me and I at him, and I realized, with a strange sense of shock and fear and nausea all combined, that his face and voice were known to me too well. Two men--one English, the other French--meet by chance in a provincial railway station and are astounded that they are so much alike that they could easily pass for each other. Over the course of a long evening, they talk and drink. It is not until he awakes the next day that John, the Englishman, realizes that he may have spoken too much. His French companion is gone, having stolen his identity. For his part, John has no choice but to take the Frenchman's place--as master of a chateau, director of a failing business, head of a large and embittered family, and keeper of too many secrets.
Loaded with suspense and crackling wit, "The Scapegoat" tells the double story of the attempts by John, the imposter, to escape detection by the family, servants, and several mistresses of his alter ego, and of his constant and frustrating efforts to unravel the mystery of the enigmatic past that dominates the existence of all who live in the chateau.
Hailed by the "New York Times" as a masterpiece of "artfully compulsive storytelling," "The Scapegoat" brings us Daphne du Maurier at the very top of her form.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 352 pages, 8.28 × 5.46 × 0.85 in

Published: February 27, 2000

Publisher: University Of Pennsylvania Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 081221725x

ISBN - 13: 9780812217254

Found in: Fiction and Literature, Traditional British

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from really enjoyed it! i love the plot of this book because it's unbelievablely interesting! i love how John has to pretend to be Jean and figure out the whole family history which is boring if you think about it but when Daphne du Maurier writes it's just so gorgeous! It's really addictive...but when John realized that he was being mistaken for Jean in the beginning of the novel, why didn't he start speaking english? John is also english so an english accent would be even more unique to define him as john and not as jean but then the novel wouldn't have even started. the ending is also a bit lacking because i sort of wanted a death lol or something evil to happen but he just FINALLY ended up-well i won't say. Good book!
Date published: 2006-07-31

– More About This Product –

The Scapegoat

The Scapegoat

by Daphne Du Maurier

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 352 pages, 8.28 × 5.46 × 0.85 in

Published: February 27, 2000

Publisher: University Of Pennsylvania Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 081221725x

ISBN - 13: 9780812217254

About the Book

"Someone jolted my elbow as I drank and said, 'Je vous demande pardon, ' and as I moved to give him space he turned and stared at me and I at him, and I realized, with a strange sense of shock and fear and nausea all combined, that his face and voice were

From the Publisher

"Someone jolted my elbow as I drank and said, 'Je vous demande pardon, ' and as I moved to give him space he turned and stared at me and I at him, and I realized, with a strange sense of shock and fear and nausea all combined, that his face and voice were known to me too well. Two men--one English, the other French--meet by chance in a provincial railway station and are astounded that they are so much alike that they could easily pass for each other. Over the course of a long evening, they talk and drink. It is not until he awakes the next day that John, the Englishman, realizes that he may have spoken too much. His French companion is gone, having stolen his identity. For his part, John has no choice but to take the Frenchman's place--as master of a chateau, director of a failing business, head of a large and embittered family, and keeper of too many secrets.
Loaded with suspense and crackling wit, "The Scapegoat" tells the double story of the attempts by John, the imposter, to escape detection by the family, servants, and several mistresses of his alter ego, and of his constant and frustrating efforts to unravel the mystery of the enigmatic past that dominates the existence of all who live in the chateau.
Hailed by the "New York Times" as a masterpiece of "artfully compulsive storytelling," "The Scapegoat" brings us Daphne du Maurier at the very top of her form.

About the Author

Born in London, the daughter of an actor, Gerald Du Maurier, and granddaughter of the novelist Goerge Du Maurier, Daphne Du Maurier was educated in Paris. Of her early life she wrote, "The Du Maurier family, like every other family in England, lived without fear of the future, happy in the security they believed to be enduring." In 1932 she married Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Browning and moved to Cornwall, where she has lived most of her life. Du Maurier began writing short stories of mystery and suspense for magazines in 1925, a collection of which appeared as The Apple Tree in 1952. Her first novel, The Loving Tree, was published in 1931. She followed with two more novels that enjoyed moderate success. Then, in 1936, she published Jamaica Inn, the first of the mystery-suspense romances that were to make her famous. Her most successful novel, Rebecca, appeared in 1938. Du Maurier's tightly woven, highly suspenseful plots and her strong characters make her stories perfect for adaptation to film or television. Among her many novels that were made into successful films are Jamaica Inn, Rebecca, Frenchman's Creek (1941), Hungry Hill (1943), My Cousin Rachel (1952), and The Scapegoat (1957). Her short story "The Birds" (1953)was brought to screen by director Alfred Hitchcock in a treatment that has become a classic horror-suspense film.

From Our Editors

According to lore everyone has a double somewhere in the world. Daphne Du Maurier’s compelling novel of identities lost and assumed is accepted as one of her finest and most artfully told works of literature. Detailing the chain of events that ensue after an Englishman meets his French double who shortly afterwards assumes his identity, forcing him to do the same, The Scapegoat follows the main character as he attempts to maintain his assumed identify until he is able to regain his own.

Editorial Reviews

"A good original novel, well tinged with nightmare."--"Times Literary Supplement"