The Science of the Mind

Paperback | March 5, 1991

byOwen Flanagan

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Consciousness emerges as the key topic in this second edition of Owen Flanagan's popular introduction to cognitive science and the philosophy of psychology. in a new chapter Flanagan develops a neurophilosophical theory of subjective mental life. He brings recent developments in the theory of neuronal group selection and connectionism to bear on the problems of the evolution of consciousness, qualia, the unique first-personal aspects of consciousness, the causal role of consciousness, and the function and development of the sense of personal identity. He has also substantially revised the chapter on cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence to incorporate recent discussions of connectionism and parallel distributed processing.

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Consciousness emerges as the key topic in this second edition of Owen Flanagan's popular introduction to cognitive science and the philosophy of psychology. in a new chapter Flanagan develops a neurophilosophical theory of subjective mental life. He brings recent developments in the theory of neuronal group selection and connectionism ...

Owen Flanagan is James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He is the author of Consciousness Reconsidered and The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World, both published by the MIT Press, and other books.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:440 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:March 5, 1991Publisher:The MIT Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0262560569

ISBN - 13:9780262560566

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To survey the contemporary scene as intelligently and judiciously as Flanagan does here is no mean accomplishment. As an unpolemical guide to current issues in the philosophy of psychology, it is an important contribution to the literature.