The Self-respecting Child: Development Through Spontaneous Play

Paperback | January 22, 1989

byAlison Stallibrass, John Caldwell Holt

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This classic study of the spontaneous play of young children combines vivid and delightful observations with profoundly important insights. Alison Stallibrass, an expert on children's play and the mother of five children, makes clear the importance of uninhibited games and activities, without adult interference, in building a child's skill, judgment, and self-esteem, and shows how to make this kind of play possible in a nursery school, day-care center, or at home.

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From Our Editors

This classic study of child development, unavailable in recent years, combines observations of children playing with insight into the nature and meaning of their games

From the Publisher

This classic study of the spontaneous play of young children combines vivid and delightful observations with profoundly important insights. Alison Stallibrass, an expert on children's play and the mother of five children, makes clear the importance of uninhibited games and activities, without adult interference, in building a child's s...

Helen Alison Stallibrass (nee Scott) grew up in the country, the eldest of five children. In the years before World War II she was a student/assistant to the research staff of the Pioneer Health Centre in Peckham, London. The influential program of this family club cum research stations was known internationally as The Peckham Experime...
Format:PaperbackDimensions:284 pages, 8 × 5 × 0.78 inPublished:January 22, 1989Publisher:Da Capo Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:020119340X

ISBN - 13:9780201193404

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From Our Editors

This classic study of child development, unavailable in recent years, combines observations of children playing with insight into the nature and meaning of their games