The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning, and Cognition by Andrea TylerThe Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning, and Cognition by Andrea Tyler

The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning, and Cognition

byAndrea Tyler, Vyvyan Evans

Paperback | November 5, 2007

Pricing and Purchase Info

$51.72 online 
$61.95 list price save 16%
Earn 259 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Using a cognitive linguistics perspective, this work provides the most comprehensive, theoretical analysis of the semantics of English prepositions available. All English prepositions are originally coded as spatial relations between two physical entities. While retaining their original meaning, prepositions have also developed a rich set of non-spatial meanings. Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans argue that all the meanings are systematically related through a set of cognitive principles, emphasizing the importance of human experience with the world as the foundation for lexical meaning.
Title:The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning, and CognitionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:268 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:November 5, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521044634

ISBN - 13:9780521044639

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. The nature of meaning; 2. Embodied meaning and spatial experience; 3. Towards a model of principled polysemy: spatial scenes and conceptualization; 4. The semantic network for over; 5. The vertical axis; 6. Spatial particles of orientation; 7. Bounded landmarks; 8. Conclusion; References; Index.

Editorial Reviews

'The authors present a very detailed descriptive analysis ... this well-produced and well-edited book is highly relevant for linguists interested in (cognitive) lexical semantics, polysemy, and spatial particles.' Journal of Linguistics