The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia, Third Edition by Tim JudahThe Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia, Third Edition by Tim Judah

The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia, Third Edition

byTim Judah

Paperback | February 16, 2010

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Journalist Tim Judah's classic account, now brought fully up to date to include the overthrow of Milosevic, the assassination of Zoran Djindic, the breakaway of Kosovo, and the arrest of Radovan Karadzic.

 

Praise for the first edition:

 

"A lively and balanced history of the Serbs."-Aleksa Djilas, New York Times Book Review

 

"Judah writes splendidly. . . .The story he tells does much to explain both the Serb obsession with the treachery of outsiders and their quasi-religious faith in the eventual founding, or rather reestablishment, of the Serbian state."-Mark Danner, New York Review of Books 

 

"Judah's book is probably the best attempt to date to explain the calamitous situation of the Serbs today through a meticulous consideration of the Serb past."-David Rieff, Toronto Globe and Mail

 

Tim Judah was Balkans correspondent for the London Times and the Economist, and has been a frequent contributor The New York Review of Books.

Timothy Judah was Balkans correspondent for the London Times and the Economist reporting from Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the former Yugoslavia.
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Title:The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia, Third EditionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 1.28 inPublished:February 16, 2010Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300158262

ISBN - 13:9780300158267

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"The aim of this book is to trace the history of the Serbs and to explain how they came to be where they are, and in the case of Croatia were until 1995. It is to trace the way that the centre of Serbian life migrated with its people from south to north and to explain how the idea of 'Serbdom,' as the Serbs call it, was kept alive during the centuries of Ottoman rule. It is also to explore why, with the fall of communism, they enthusiastically acclaimed Slobodan Milosevic, an opportunistic and cynical leader who was interested only in power."—From the preface