The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

by Patrick Rothfuss

Daw | October 28, 2014 | Hardcover

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things is rated 5 out of 5 by 4.
Deep below the University, there is a dark place. Few people know of it: a broken web of ancient passageways and abandoned rooms. A young woman lives there, tucked among the sprawling tunnels of the Underthing, snug in the heart of this forgotten place.

Her name is Auri, and she is full of mysteries.

The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a brief, bittersweet glimpse of Auri’s life, a small adventure all her own. At once joyous and haunting, this story offers a chance to see the world through Auri’s eyes. And it gives the reader a chance to learn things that only Auri knows....

In this book, Patrick Rothfuss brings us into the world of one of The Kingkiller Chronicle’s most enigmatic characters. Full of secrets and mysteries, The Slow Regard of Silent Things is the story of a broken girl trying to live in a broken world.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 8.27 × 5.5 × 0.62 in

Published: October 28, 2014

Publisher: Daw

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0756410436

ISBN - 13: 9780756410438

Found in: Science Fiction and Fantasy

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The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

Hardcover | October 28, 2014
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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Not A Typical Story - In A Great Way! I could not have been more surprised by The Slow Regard of Silent Things. It's not a story in the usual sense - it's not a quest/hero's journey; there's no typical building arc with conflict and resolution, or any of that usual stuff. Instead, what we have is, essentially, a week in the life of the broken and intriguing Auri, who lives mostly below ground in a world of her own. We get to see how she lives and learn why she does what she does (not what broke her, but rather her current worldview). At 150 pages, The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a delicate, emotionally fraught novella that is frequently mesmerizing and heart-breakingly poignant. If you need quests and heroics and such, this is not the story for you. If, on the other hand, you love character and intelligence and are open to the very different, it will probably enthrall you. It did me.
Date published: 2015-03-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful "Well, after that she would do her best. That was the only way. You did not want things for yourself. That made you small. That kept you safe. That meant you could move smoothly through the world without upsetting every applecart you came across. And if you were careful, if you were a proper part of things, then you could help. You mended what was cracked. You tended to the things you found askew. And you trusted that the world in turn would brush you up against the chance to eat. It was the only graceful way to move. All else was vanity and pride." Last week I read some of the initial reviews on Goodreads and they were varied. On one hand, you have the people who didn't like it. Who begrudge Mr. Rothfuss for writing it. I assume (probably wrongly, but it's my assumption so I'll take the risk) that these are people who have never really felt lonely. Lost. Not proper true. Oh, they've been through some tough circumstances, but to know what it is to be truly forlorn is foreign to them. The "Ambroses" of the world. They're not necessarily bad people. They just don't know the feeling of being "the only one that tended to the proper turning of the world." On the other hand, us. Those who have walked through the valley of isolation, abandonment, neglect, etc, and still have the dust of it on our face, our hands, our feet. Those who understand what it is to feel that things aren't quite as they should be and who try to mend the little incongruences. I found a part of myself in Auri even before "The Slow Regard of Silent Things", but this glimpse into her day to day world really solidified it. And I loved her all the more for it. She just resonates with me in so many ways. Her story is pitiful and beautiful and raw, full of soaring hope and gut-wrenching despair. Some of my favourite moments were the most quiet and sweet. When she finished her soap (especially the little poem: "She went to Clinks. She washed herself. She brushed her hair. She laughed and leapt. She hurried home. She went to bed. And all alone, she smiled and slept."), I shared her delight. Her panic attack broke my heart ("She knew. She knew how quickly things could break. You did the things you could. You tended the world for the world's sake. You hoped you would be safe. But still she knew. It could come crashing down and there was nothing you could do."). This woman who takes care of the entire Underthing, and yet doesn't remember to eat. This woman who finds such joy in the simplest of things and has the freedom to express all her joy and pain and triumph and fear without shame. This woman, so fragile and so strong. I envy her. I empathize with her. "The Name of the Wind" and "Wise Man's Fear" are books of the face, the hands, the feet. Auri's story is one of the heart, the mind, the soul. I echo Vi Hart's sentiments: Mr. Rothfuss made me feel more empathy for Auri's inanimate companions than a lot of authors make me feel about their main characters. I would say of Auri what she said of the gear: "Poor thing. To be so lovely and so lost. To be all answerful with all that knowing trapped inside. To be beautiful and broken." And now, a note to Mr. Rothfuss. First of all, thank you. Thank you for having the courage to write this, to show Vi Hart, to show your other trusted friends, and to allow them to publish this sublime tome. You knew people were going to be pissed, and you did it anyway. But as Vi so wisely said, "Those people have stories written for them all the time. What about me? Where's the story for people like me?" Second of all, the people who were disappointed, angry, apathetic - it is their fault that they missed the quiet, resplendent elegance. Thirdly, there are people who begrudge you for writing this with Doors of Stone still unpublished. I disagree vehemently with them. I think you should write exactly what you'd like to write, and you should take exactly as long as you'd like to do so. As you said in the afterword, you grew your craft through writing Auri's story, and I love that you are still looking to improve and be challenged. I hope above all things that you don't feel the weight of everyone's expectations over much and that you allow yourself the freedom to continue to stretch yourself. To live. To breathe. You owe yourself that. And after all you've given to us, your readers, we owe it to you as well.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Vulnerability in Book Form "Well, after that she would do her best. That was the only way. You did not want things for yourself. That made you small. That kept you safe. That meant you could move smoothly through the world without upsetting every applecart you came across. And if you were careful, if you were a proper part of things, then you could help. You mended what was cracked. You tended to the things you found askew. And you trusted that the world in turn would brush you up against the chance to eat. It was the only graceful way to move. All else was vanity and pride." Last week I read some of the initial reviews on Goodreads and they were varied. On one hand, you have the people who didn't like it. Who begrudge Mr. Rothfuss for writing it. I assume (probably wrongly, but it's my assumption so I'll take the risk) that these are people who have never really felt lonely. Lost. Not proper true. Oh, they've been through some tough circumstances, but to know what it is to be truly forlorn is foreign to them. The "Ambroses" of the world. They're not necessarily bad people. They just don't know the feeling of being "the only one that tended to the proper turning of the world." On the other hand, us. Those who have walked through the valley of isolation, abandonment, neglect, etc, and still have the dust of it on our face, our hands, our feet. Those who understand what it is to feel that things aren't quite as they should be and who try to mend the little incongruences. I found a part of myself in Auri even before "The Slow Regard of Silent Things", but this glimpse into her day to day world really solidified it. And I loved her all the more for it. She just resonates with me in so many ways. Her story is pitiful and beautiful and raw, full of soaring hope and gut-wrenching despair. Some of my favourite moments were the most quiet and sweet. When she finished her soap (especially the little poem: "She went to Clinks. She washed herself. She brushed her hair. She laughed and leapt. She hurried home. She went to bed. And all alone, she smiled and slept."), I shared her delight. Her panic attack broke my heart ("She knew. She knew how quickly things could break. You did the things you could. You tended the world for the world's sake. You hoped you would be safe. But still she knew. It could come crashing down and there was nothing you could do."). This woman who takes care of the entire Underthing, and yet doesn't remember to eat. This woman who finds such joy in the simplest of things and has the freedom to express all her joy and pain and triumph and fear without shame. This woman, so fragile and so strong. I envy her. I empathize with her. "The Name of the Wind" and "Wise Man's Fear" are books of the face, the hands, the feet. Auri's story is one of the heart, the mind, the soul. I echo Vi Hart's sentiments: Mr. Rothfuss made me feel more empathy for Auri's inanimate companions than a lot of authors make me feel about their main characters. I would say of Auri what she said of the gear: "Poor thing. To be so lovely and so lost. To be all answerful with all that knowing trapped inside. To be beautiful and broken." And now, a note to Mr. Rothfuss. First of all, thank you. Thank you for having the courage to write this, to show Vi Hart, to show your other trusted friends, and to allow them to publish this sublime tome. You knew people were going to be pissed, and you did it anyway. But as Vi so wisely said, "Those people have stories written for them all the time. What about me? Where's the story for people like me?" Second of all, the people who were disappointed, angry, apathetic - it is their fault that they missed the quiet, resplendent elegance. Thirdly, there are people who begrudge you for writing this with Doors of Stone still unpublished. I disagree vehemently with them. I think you should write exactly what you'd like to write, and you should take exactly as long as you'd like to do so. As you said in the afterword, you grew your craft through writing Auri's story, and I love that you are still looking to improve and be challenged. I hope above all things that you don't feel the weight of everyone's expectations over much and that you allow yourself the freedom to continue to stretch yourself. To live. To breathe. You owe yourself that. And after all you've given to us, your readers, we owe it to you as well.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A nice addition to the series I wouldn't classify this as a story, more of a novella. A well-thought through addition to the series. If you have read the first two novels of the King-killer Chronicles, which i would consider a pre-requisite to this book, then you will immediately understand why it's is written a certain way. If you are looking for a continuation of Kvothes story-line, you wont find it hear. But you will find a great story that a nice abridgment to the (hopefully) soon to be released last book in the series. Definite recommend.
Date published: 2014-10-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A look into the mind of There isn't much I can add to all of the other rave reviews. More than just the story, it's how Rothfuss tells the story. There are not many writers up to his calibre, so I had high hopes for this book and I wasn't disappointed. This isn't a typical story in the pure sense of the word, but more of a character sketch of Auri - what she does when we don't see her with Kvothe and a peek into her mind. The story satisfied my curiosity in some ways, but also left me with more questions - questions which I hope that Rothfuss will cover in the third book. Don't let the naysayers who didn't actually review the story, but gave it one star based on price, dissuade you from reading this. Yes, there are a plethora of .99 cent books, which might be nice if you're looking for quantity over quality. Having read quite a few of them, there are some good plots, but those writer's can't bring you into their world like Rothfuss can. They tell you a story, but Rothfuss brings you into his world and makes you care about it. You get what you pay for.
Date published: 2015-02-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful A beautiful story of things, and the stories of things, and the small broken girl who knows the stories of the things. Pat Rothfuss has a magical way of invoking feelings and giving life to things we take for granted. Things we don't expect to have much to tell. Whether its the sound of silence in three parts, or the perfection of three parts of three.
Date published: 2015-02-26
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Too short for the price! Enjoyed the book but extremely disappointed at the novella length! Judging by the cost of the purchase, I expected the length of the other Rothfuss books and so did not pay attention to the number of pages. I'm trying not to whine but in truth I feel somewhat cheated. A shame as I very much enjoy the author's work
Date published: 2015-02-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Only thing I didn't like was the price The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a sweet look at a week in the underthing from Auri's point of view... that's it. There is no major plot, no Kvothe, no action, and only a few revelations about Auri. So if you're looking to further the KingKiller Chronicle strory line you'll be disappointed. Rothfuss even warns as much in the foreword. It's also very short, so you're paying full price for a short novella that doesn't stand well on its own. That all being said, I quite liked it. I knew what I was getting into and I was interested in learning more about Auri. It doesn't follow the typical story formula, sure, but Auri isn't a typical character. A lot of reviews mention that the writing is self indulgent but that's to be expected from Rothfuss. If none of this sounds interesting to you, don't buy it, you wont be missing anything story wise. However if it does, you'll probably enjoy it. I did.
Date published: 2015-02-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Delightful Oh, someday, Mr Rothfuss, someday a prequel about how Auri came to be broken would be a very interesting read as well. I very much enjoyed this peek into Auri's world and mind. In some ways reminiscent of "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime" As the author warns, though, it is different. He says you need to have read the previous books first, but I'm not sure, though there's an additional depth to he back story if you have. A quirky novella about a solitary broken girl and her inanimate friends.
Date published: 2014-11-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Reader of many books I really enjoyed this, April is a fascinating character and she has tremendous deep currents inside her. What happened to make her this way? Where will she go from here? She's withdrawn from the world, bit I don't think the world is willing to let her go so easily - what will she do to bring things true? A lovely story and memorable.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful "Well, after that she would do her best. That was the only way. You did not want things for yourself. That made you small. That kept you safe. That meant you could move smoothly through the world without upsetting every applecart you came across. And if you were careful, if you were a proper part of things, then you could help. You mended what was cracked. You tended to the things you found askew. And you trusted that the world in turn would brush you up against the chance to eat. It was the only graceful way to move. All else was vanity and pride." Last week I read some of the initial reviews on Goodreads and they were varied. On one hand, you have the people who didn't like it. Who begrudge Mr. Rothfuss for writing it. I assume (probably wrongly, but it's my assumption so I'll take the risk) that these are people who have never really felt lonely. Lost. Not proper true. Oh, they've been through some tough circumstances, but to know what it is to be truly forlorn is foreign to them. The "Ambroses" of the world. They're not necessarily bad people. They just don't know the feeling of being "the only one that tended to the proper turning of the world." On the other hand, us. Those who have walked through the valley of isolation, abandonment, neglect, etc, and still have the dust of it on our face, our hands, our feet. Those who understand what it is to feel that things aren't quite as they should be and who try to mend the little incongruences. I found a part of myself in Auri even before "The Slow Regard of Silent Things", but this glimpse into her day to day world really solidified it. And I loved her all the more for it. She just resonates with me in so many ways. Her story is pitiful and beautiful and raw, full of soaring hope and gut-wrenching despair. Some of my favourite moments were the most quiet and sweet. When she finished her soap (especially the little poem: "She went to Clinks. She washed herself. She brushed her hair. She laughed and leapt. She hurried home. She went to bed. And all alone, she smiled and slept."), I shared her delight. Her panic attack broke my heart ("She knew. She knew how quickly things could break. You did the things you could. You tended the world for the world's sake. You hoped you would be safe. But still she knew. It could come crashing down and there was nothing you could do."). This woman who takes care of the entire Underthing, and yet doesn't remember to eat. This woman who finds such joy in the simplest of things and has the freedom to express all her joy and pain and triumph and fear without shame. This woman, so fragile and so strong. I envy her. I empathize with her. "The Name of the Wind" and "Wise Man's Fear" are books of the face, the hands, the feet. Auri's story is one of the heart, the mind, the soul. I echo Vi Hart's sentiments: Mr. Rothfuss made me feel more empathy for Auri's inanimate companions than a lot of authors make me feel about their main characters. I would say of Auri what she said of the gear: "Poor thing. To be so lovely and so lost. To be all answerful with all that knowing trapped inside. To be beautiful and broken." And now, a note to Mr. Rothfuss. First of all, thank you. Thank you for having the courage to write this, to show Vi Hart, to show your other trusted friends, and to allow them to publish this sublime tome. You knew people were going to be pissed, and you did it anyway. But as Vi so wisely said, "Those people have stories written for them all the time. What about me? Where's the story for people like me?" Second of all, the people who were disappointed, angry, apathetic - it is their fault that they missed the quiet, resplendent elegance. Thirdly, there are people who begrudge you for writing this with Doors of Stone still unpublished. I disagree vehemently with them. I think you should write exactly what you'd like to write, and you should take exactly as long as you'd like to do so. As you said in the afterword, you grew your craft through writing Auri's story, and I love that you are still looking to improve and be challenged. I hope above all things that you don't feel the weight of everyone's expectations over much and that you allow yourself the freedom to continue to stretch yourself. To live. To breathe. You owe yourself that. And after all you've given to us, your readers, we owe it to you as well.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Vulnerability in Book Form "Well, after that she would do her best. That was the only way. You did not want things for yourself. That made you small. That kept you safe. That meant you could move smoothly through the world without upsetting every applecart you came across. And if you were careful, if you were a proper part of things, then you could help. You mended what was cracked. You tended to the things you found askew. And you trusted that the world in turn would brush you up against the chance to eat. It was the only graceful way to move. All else was vanity and pride." Last week I read some of the initial reviews on Goodreads and they were varied. On one hand, you have the people who didn't like it. Who begrudge Mr. Rothfuss for writing it. I assume (probably wrongly, but it's my assumption so I'll take the risk) that these are people who have never really felt lonely. Lost. Not proper true. Oh, they've been through some tough circumstances, but to know what it is to be truly forlorn is foreign to them. The "Ambroses" of the world. They're not necessarily bad people. They just don't know the feeling of being "the only one that tended to the proper turning of the world." On the other hand, us. Those who have walked through the valley of isolation, abandonment, neglect, etc, and still have the dust of it on our face, our hands, our feet. Those who understand what it is to feel that things aren't quite as they should be and who try to mend the little incongruences. I found a part of myself in Auri even before "The Slow Regard of Silent Things", but this glimpse into her day to day world really solidified it. And I loved her all the more for it. She just resonates with me in so many ways. Her story is pitiful and beautiful and raw, full of soaring hope and gut-wrenching despair. Some of my favourite moments were the most quiet and sweet. When she finished her soap (especially the little poem: "She went to Clinks. She washed herself. She brushed her hair. She laughed and leapt. She hurried home. She went to bed. And all alone, she smiled and slept."), I shared her delight. Her panic attack broke my heart ("She knew. She knew how quickly things could break. You did the things you could. You tended the world for the world's sake. You hoped you would be safe. But still she knew. It could come crashing down and there was nothing you could do."). This woman who takes care of the entire Underthing, and yet doesn't remember to eat. This woman who finds such joy in the simplest of things and has the freedom to express all her joy and pain and triumph and fear without shame. This woman, so fragile and so strong. I envy her. I empathize with her. "The Name of the Wind" and "Wise Man's Fear" are books of the face, the hands, the feet. Auri's story is one of the heart, the mind, the soul. I echo Vi Hart's sentiments: Mr. Rothfuss made me feel more empathy for Auri's inanimate companions than a lot of authors make me feel about their main characters. I would say of Auri what she said of the gear: "Poor thing. To be so lovely and so lost. To be all answerful with all that knowing trapped inside. To be beautiful and broken." And now, a note to Mr. Rothfuss. First of all, thank you. Thank you for having the courage to write this, to show Vi Hart, to show your other trusted friends, and to allow them to publish this sublime tome. You knew people were going to be pissed, and you did it anyway. But as Vi so wisely said, "Those people have stories written for them all the time. What about me? Where's the story for people like me?" Second of all, the people who were disappointed, angry, apathetic - it is their fault that they missed the quiet, resplendent elegance. Thirdly, there are people who begrudge you for writing this with Doors of Stone still unpublished. I disagree vehemently with them. I think you should write exactly what you'd like to write, and you should take exactly as long as you'd like to do so. As you said in the afterword, you grew your craft through writing Auri's story, and I love that you are still looking to improve and be challenged. I hope above all things that you don't feel the weight of everyone's expectations over much and that you allow yourself the freedom to continue to stretch yourself. To live. To breathe. You owe yourself that. And after all you've given to us, your readers, we owe it to you as well.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Pleasant surprise I didn't expect this story so be what it is, but in its own strange way, it's perfect
Date published: 2014-11-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by from The Slow Regard of Silent Things Disappointing in comparison to the rest of the books in this series. Felt more like one chapter than a book.
Date published: 2014-11-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Oddly excellent Not what you might expect but definitely worth the read.
Date published: 2014-11-11
Rated 2 out of 5 by from The slow regard of silent things. To short. I felt cheated. I was expecting something else.
Date published: 2014-11-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from :) I have a new love for Auri. Mr. Rothfuss, sir, you did not disappoint.
Date published: 2014-11-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic companion novella As the author says, you really should read The Name of the Wind before you read this, although in my opinion it stands alone quite well. I'm not normally a fan of novellas or short stories, but this is one of those rare short and sweet gems. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2014-11-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A nice addition to the series I wouldn't classify this as a story, more of a novella. A well-thought through addition to the series. If you have read the first two novels of the King-killer Chronicles, which i would consider a pre-requisite to this book, then you will immediately understand why it's is written a certain way. If you are looking for a continuation of Kvothes story-line, you wont find it hear. But you will find a great story that a nice abridgment to the (hopefully) soon to be released last book in the series. Definite recommend.
Date published: 2014-10-22

– More About This Product –

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

by Patrick Rothfuss

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 8.27 × 5.5 × 0.62 in

Published: October 28, 2014

Publisher: Daw

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0756410436

ISBN - 13: 9780756410438

Read from the Book

THE FAR BELOW BOTTOM OF THINGSWHEN AURI WOKE, she knew that she had seven days.Yes. She was quite sure of it. He would come for a visit on the seventh day.A long time. Long for waiting. But not so long for everything that needed to be done. Not if she were careful. Not if she wanted to be ready.Opening her eyes, Auri saw a whisper of dim light. A rare thing, as she was tucked tidily away in Mantle, her privatest of places. It was a white day, then. A deep day. A finding day. She smiled, excitement fizzing in her chest.There was just enough light to see the pale shape of her arm as her fingers found the dropper bottle on her bedshelf. She unscrewed it and let a single drip fall into Foxen’s dish. After a moment he slowly brightened into a faint gloaming blue.Moving carefully, Auri pushed back her blanket so it wouldn’t touch the floor. She slipped out of bed, the stone floor warm beneath her feet. Her basin rested on the table near her bed, next to a sliver of her sweetest soap. None of it had changed in the night. That was good.Auri squeezed another drop directly onto Foxen. She hesitated, then grinned and let a third drop fall. No half measures on a finding day. She gathered up her blanket then, folding and folding it up, carefully tucking it under her chin to keep it from brushing against the floor.Foxen’s light continued to swell. First the merest flickering: a fleck, a distant star. Then more of him began to iridesce, a firefly’s worth. Still more his brightness grew till
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From the Publisher

Deep below the University, there is a dark place. Few people know of it: a broken web of ancient passageways and abandoned rooms. A young woman lives there, tucked among the sprawling tunnels of the Underthing, snug in the heart of this forgotten place.

Her name is Auri, and she is full of mysteries.

The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a brief, bittersweet glimpse of Auri’s life, a small adventure all her own. At once joyous and haunting, this story offers a chance to see the world through Auri’s eyes. And it gives the reader a chance to learn things that only Auri knows....

In this book, Patrick Rothfuss brings us into the world of one of The Kingkiller Chronicle’s most enigmatic characters. Full of secrets and mysteries, The Slow Regard of Silent Things is the story of a broken girl trying to live in a broken world.

About the Author

Patrick Rothfuss currently lives in central Wisconsin where he teaches at the local university. Patrick loves words, laughs often, and dabbles in alchemy. His first novel, The Name of the Wind, was a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year. Its sequel, The Wise Man’s Fear, debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestseller chart and won the David Gemmell Legend Award. He recently released a novella, The Slow Regard of Silent Things, which is set in the same universe as his first two titles. His novels have appeared on NPR’s Top 100 Science Fiction/Fantasy Books list and Locus’ Best 21st Century Fantasy Fiction Novels list. He can be found at patrickrothfuss.com.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for Patrick Rothfuss: "As seamless and lyrical as a song... This breathtakingly epic story is heartrending in its intimacy and masterful in its narrative essence."—Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Reminiscent in scope of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series and similar in feel to the narrative tour de force of The Arabian Nights, this masterpiece of storytelling will appeal to lovers of fantasy on a grand scale."—Library Journal (starred review) "It is a rare and great pleasure to find a fantasist writing...with true music in the words.... Wherever Pat Rothfuss goes...he'll carry us with him as a good singer carries us through a song."—Ursula K LeGuin "The Wise Man's Fear is a beautiful book to read. Masterful prose, a sense of cohesion to the storytelling, a wonderful sense of pacing.... There is beauty to Pat's writing that defies description."—Brandon Sanderson "Patrick Rothfuss has real talent, and his tale of Kvothe is deep and intricate and wondrous."—Terry Brooks "[Rothfuss is] the great new fantasy writer we've been waiting for, and this is an astonishing book."—Orson Scott Card "As with all very best books in our field, it's not the fantasy trappings (as wonderful as they are) that make this novel so good, but what the author has to say about true, common things, about ambition and failure, art, love, and loss."—Tad Williams “This is an extremely immersive story set in a flawlessly constructed world and told extremely well.”—Jo Walton, Tor.com “It is the be
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