The Songs of Aristophanes

Hardcover | February 1, 1997

byL. P. E. Parker

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A comedy of Aristophanes was in large measure a musical performance, and his lyric verse covers a wide range of styles - from popular song to parody of tragedy. The music is lost, and our only way of recovering something of the experience of an Athenian audience is by studying the rhythms ofthe poetry. This book provides a full text, with scansions, of the lyric of the surviving plays, and an introduction to the different rhythms used by Aristophanes, their origins, and literary associations. Dr Parker pays particular attention to showing the role played by lyric metre in the structureof the plays and to distinguishing the different levels of musical style, thus illustrating the integral part metre plays in Aristophanes' dramatic art and satire. She also discusses fully the metrical aspects of textual problems in Aristophanes' lyric, and a section of the introduction traces theevolution of the study of Aristophanes' metres and the influence this has on the text.

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From Our Editors

This books provides a full text, with scansions, of the lyric of the surviving plays, and an introduction to the different rhythms used by Aristophanes, their origins, and literary associations. Dr. Parker pays particular attention to the role played by lyric metre in the structure of the plays and to distinguishing the different level...

From the Publisher

A comedy of Aristophanes was in large measure a musical performance, and his lyric verse covers a wide range of styles - from popular song to parody of tragedy. The music is lost, and our only way of recovering something of the experience of an Athenian audience is by studying the rhythms ofthe poetry. This book provides a full text, w...

From the Jacket

This books provides a full text, with scansions, of the lyric of the surviving plays, and an introduction to the different rhythms used by Aristophanes, their origins, and literary associations. Dr. Parker pays particular attention to the role played by lyric metre in the structure of the plays and to distinguishing the different level...

L. P. E. Parker is at St Hugh's College, Oxford.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:604 pages, 8.46 × 5.35 × 1.54 inPublished:February 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198149441

ISBN - 13:9780198149446

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From Our Editors

This books provides a full text, with scansions, of the lyric of the surviving plays, and an introduction to the different rhythms used by Aristophanes, their origins, and literary associations. Dr. Parker pays particular attention to the role played by lyric metre in the structure of the plays and to distinguishing the different levels of metrical style, thus illustrating the integral part metre plays in Aristophanes' dramatic art and satire.

Editorial Reviews

`The explanatory text is highly readable because of its refreshingly low amount of footnotes. Important quotations and bibliographical references are integrated into the text, giving the impression of a lively discussion ... Parker incorporates her scholarly knowledge into the discussion andevaluates opposing views only where absolutely vital. She offers sensitive observations and readings without ever exceeding the self-imposed limits.'Christoph Kugelmeier, Bryn Mawr Classical Review