The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

The Sound and the Fury

byWilliam Faulkner

Kobo ebook | May 18, 2011

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The Sound and the Fury is the tragedy of the Compson family, featuring some of the most memorable characters in literature: beautiful, rebellious Caddy; the manchild Benjy; haunted, neurotic Quentin; Jason, the brutal cynic; and Dilsey, their black servant. Their lives fragmented and harrowed by history and legacy, the character’s voices and actions mesh to create what is arguably Faulkner’s masterpiece and  one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century.


“I give you the mausoleum of all hope and desire. . . . I give it to you not that you may remember time, but that you might forget it now and then for a moment and not spend all of your breath trying to conquer it. Because no battle is ever won he said. They are not even fought. The field only reveals to man his own folly and despair, and victory is an illusion of philosophers and fools.” —from The Sound and the Fury

Born in an old Mississippi family, William Faulkner made his home in Oxford, seat of the University of Mississippi. After the fifth grade he went to school only off and on-lived, read, and wrote much as he pleased. In 1918, refusing to enlist with the "Yankees," he joined the Canadian Air Force, and was transferred to the British Royal...
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Title:The Sound and the FuryFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:May 18, 2011Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307792153

ISBN - 13:9780307792150

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Experimental style didn't work for me. The story of a crumbling southern family was muddled by the experimental style of the novel. The book is divided into sections told from a different character's perspective. Reading through section one is the most difficult and requires a lot of rereading and deciphering, but I thought the book picked up in the later sections. While I appreciate experimentation in writing, I felt it didn't always work in this novel.
Date published: 2017-07-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worth the Effort I chose this as my first Faulkner at the suggestion of my girlfriend (she loves him, and this is her favourite). I've no problem admitting that I had a difficult time getting through it. Normally if I'm 50 pages into a book and not enjoying it, I'll put it down. This one, I knew I'd force myself to finish. Out of pride, I suppose -- and because of its reputation. About 2/3rds of the way through I was pretty frustrated that I wasn't fully grasping the depth that seemed to me was clearly there, so I sought out some 3rd party discourse to fill in a few of the blanks. It worked: wheels spun, things clicked, and after I made it to the end I immediately went back and re-read the earlier sections -- this time with a much better understanding of the plot, the characters, and the sensory devices that Faulkner uses here. Not everyone will have this experience. Some will "get" it right away; others won't care to bother. Almost a year later this still stands out as one of my most memorable and satisfying reading experiences, due to both the novel itself and the extra effort I put into my own comprehension of it. I always reserve that fifth star for books that continue to resonate with me long after I've returned them to the shelf; and so there you have it.
Date published: 2017-06-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth checking out This is a pretty intricate group of story lines that mesh appropriately together. Though the characters come from the upper class world of the American South, they are also truly relatable. Each character, despite the economic background from which they come, share many human elements such as guilt, remorse, anger, regret, resentment, depression, mental illness, jealously and the like. If you like the type of story that could be produced as a stage performance, than this is a wonderful opportunity to experience just that.
Date published: 2017-05-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ambitious style, terrible plot and characters. The stream of consciousness style that he goes for here is really brilliant. He doesn't pull it off perfectly, but it's really amazing nonetheless. What brings this from 4-5 star potential to a solid 3 is that I really did not find much of value in the story it's self even though I was blown away by how it was told. Kind of a shame that such an ambitious writing style would be applied to such stock elements of early 20th century southern writing.
Date published: 2017-04-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great book This is a hard book to follow, but that's what makes it great. The tale told by an idiot revels characterization as the plot is slowly revealed. I will read this book a third time but only when I have a few weeks to digest this masterpiece at my leisure.
Date published: 2017-01-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great American Novel Look no further. This is it.
Date published: 2016-11-21
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I had some issues The Sound and the Fury is a very challenging read and one that takes an immense amount of patience, re-reading and focus. However, this results in a novel that is narratively very interesting. My issue with it was the fact that the character around whom the narrative revolved was completely denied a voice, with all narrative being told through the male characters' gaze and their fantasies. I find that other similarly interesting modernist novels succeed much better in this regard, such as Virginia Woolf's The Waves.
Date published: 2016-11-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A difficult, but worthy read #plumreview with it's multiple narrators and especially Benjy, the initial narrator, The Sound and the Fury can be a little difficult to follow (Benjy bounces between the present and the past with very little indication of change), but once you get the rhythm down, you'll be set to enjoy a true American classic.
Date published: 2016-11-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worth the struggle Some difficult books are just not worth the struggle to finish them; this is not one of them. The first section, narrated by Benji, is full of sentence fragments and it is difficult to piece the story together. The succeeding sections are easier to read a family tragedy emerges from the fragments that's one of the greatest novels I've ever read, one that only improves with each rereading.
Date published: 2016-11-07