The Speeches Of The Right Honourable George Canning Volume 4; With A Memoir Of His Life

Paperback | May 19, 2012

byGeorge Canning

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 Excerpt: ...had not been laid before the House as a matter of course, but in consequence of motion and discussion. He was ready, however, now to meet the honourable and learned gentleman fairly on this point; and he would tell him thai it was part of the new arrangement that an account of every grant out of this fund should, as a matter of course, and without address, be laid before the House in every session, immediately after such grant. So that the only distinction remaining between him and the honourable and learned gentleman, would be whether the grant should be discussed in the House in the first instance, and be conferred in' consequence of a parliamentary vote; or whether it should first proceed from the Crown, and then be submitted to the cognizance of Parliament. He did not mean to say that this distinction was a trifling one, or one that did riot deserve the most serious examination. All he meant to say was, that the Ministers of the Crown were not prepared to propose that a long and almost immemorial usage should be abolished without the most striking proof that such usage, though co-existent with the practice, was incompatible with the spirit of the Constitution. He came now to another part of the honourable and learned gentleman's speech, a part in which the honourable and learned gentleman must himself acknowledge, on mature reflection, he could not have spoken his genuine sentiments when he proposed the change which he did propose in the revenues of the Crown. The honourable and learned gentleman had admitted that there was no remarkable abuse in the application of the funds in question, and that many of the pensions would have been readily granted by Parliament. To Lord St. Vincent, Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Parliament would have granted pen...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 Excerpt: ...had not been laid before the House as a matter of course, but in consequence of motion and discussion. He was ready, however, no...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:118 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.25 inPublished:May 19, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217896294

ISBN - 13:9780217896290

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