The Story of Big Bend National Park

Paperback | January 1, 1996

byJohn Jameson

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A breathtaking country of rugged mountain peaks, uninhabited desert, and spectacular river canyons, Big Bend is one of the United States' most remote national parks and among Texas' most popular tourist attractions. Located in the great bend of the Rio Grande that separates Texas and Mexico, the park comprises some 800,000 acres, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island, and draws over 300,000 visitors each year.

The Story of Big Bend National Park offers a comprehensive, highly readable history of the park from before its founding in 1944 up to the present. John Jameson opens with a fascinating look at the mighty efforts involved in persuading Washington officials and local landowners that such a park was needed. He details how money was raised and land acquired, as well as how the park was publicized and developed for visitors. Moving into the present, he discusses such issues as natural resource management, predator protection in the park, and challenges to land, water, and air. Along the way, he paints colorful portraits of many individuals, from area residents to park rangers to Lady Bird Johnson, whose 1966 float trip down the Rio Grande brought the park to national attention.

This history will be required reading for all visitors and prospective visitors to Big Bend National Park. For everyone concerned about our national parks, it makes a persuasive case for continued funding and wise stewardship of the parks as they face the twin pressures of skyrocketing attendance and declining budgets.

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From Our Editors

The Story Of Big Bend National Park offers a comprehensive, highly readable history of the park from its founding in 1944 up to the present. Big Bend is one of the United States' most remote national parks and among Texas' most popular tourist attractions.

From the Publisher

A breathtaking country of rugged mountain peaks, uninhabited desert, and spectacular river canyons, Big Bend is one of the United States' most remote national parks and among Texas' most popular tourist attractions. Located in the great bend of the Rio Grande that separates Texas and Mexico, the park comprises some 800,000 acres, an ar...

From the Jacket

The Story Of Big Bend National Park offers a comprehensive, highly readable history of the park from its founding in 1944 up to the present. Big Bend is one of the United States' most remote national parks and among Texas' most popular tourist attractions.

Format:PaperbackDimensions:212 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.75 inPublished:January 1, 1996Publisher:University Of Texas Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292740425

ISBN - 13:9780292740426

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Table of Contents

List of IllustrationsPrefacePrologue. A "Fabulous Corner of the World": An Introduction to Big Bend1. The Campaign for Texas' First National Park2. Texas Politics and the Park Movement, 1935-1944 3. A Park for the People from the People: Land Acquisition at Big Bend4. Promoting a Park to "Excel Yellowstone": Publicity and Public Relations5. From Dude Ranches to Haciendas: A Half-Century of Planning6. The "Predator Incubator" and Other Controversies: Managing Natural Resources7. "The Ultimate 'Tex-Mex Project'": Companion Parks on the Rio Grande8. Life and Work in a Desert Wilderness: Visitor and Employee ExperiencesEpilogue. Big Bend at Fifty: Into the Twenty-first CenturyNotesBibliographyIndex

From Our Editors

The Story Of Big Bend National Park offers a comprehensive, highly readable history of the park from its founding in 1944 up to the present. Big Bend is one of the United States' most remote national parks and among Texas' most popular tourist attractions.

Editorial Reviews

The Story of Big Bend is worth the read for anyone wanting ot learn what lives within the park, both in scenery and species, and the efforts undertaken by those willing to fight for it. As any natural area, its story will outlive us. Perhaps that is why we keep returning to it. - Jessica Schneider