The Subjective Side Of Strategy Making: Future Orientations And Perceptions Of Executives by T. K. DasThe Subjective Side Of Strategy Making: Future Orientations And Perceptions Of Executives by T. K. Das

The Subjective Side Of Strategy Making: Future Orientations And Perceptions Of Executives

byT. K. Das

Hardcover | August 1, 1986

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This book proposes a conception of the corporate strategy making process that recognizes the individual strategy maker as a center-stage corporate actor. This individual-centered view of the stategy making process is needed in order to better understand the interplay between objective factors and the subjective perceptions and values of strategy makers. Using a large sample of executives working in two of the ten largest U.S. commercial banks, Das examines empirically the dynamics of two critical aspects of the role of individual strategy makers: future orientation and perceptions of the strategic planning milieu. He discusses the various implications of his findings for further research into the strategy making process. The author demonstrates the utility of individual future orientation in understanding how strategy makers influence the character of the eventual corporate strategy. The results of Das' study help to explain why long-range planning is really more short-range than anyone cares to admit.
Title:The Subjective Side Of Strategy Making: Future Orientations And Perceptions Of ExecutivesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:292 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:August 1, 1986Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275923401

ISBN - 13:9780275923402

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?. . . Overall, this book's contribution is the expansion of strategic management research into important but heretofore unexplored area. Furthermore, by conducting empirical research that produced successful results, Das has demonstrated the potential rewards of this line of inquiry for other researchers. The book deserves to be read by those who study strategic management as well as by those who study decision making. It makes important contributions in both areas, contributions that cannot and should not be ignored. . . .?-Interfaces