The Tale Of Despereaux: Being The Story Of A Mouse, A Princess, Some Soup, And A Spool Of Thread by Kate DicamilloThe Tale Of Despereaux: Being The Story Of A Mouse, A Princess, Some Soup, And A Spool Of Thread by Kate Dicamillo

The Tale Of Despereaux: Being The Story Of A Mouse, A Princess, Some Soup, And A Spool Of Thread

byKate DicamilloIllustratorTimothy Basil Ering

Paperback | December 8, 2015

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A brave mouse, a covetous rat, a wishful serving girl, and a princess named Pea come together in Kate DiCamillo's Newbery Medal–winning tale.

Welcome to the story of Despereaux Tilling, a mouse who is in love with music, stories, and a princess named Pea. It is also the story of a rat called Roscuro, who lives in the darkness and covets a world filled with light. And it is the story of Miggery Sow, a slow-witted serving girl who harbors a simple, impossible wish. These three characters are about to embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other's lives. What happens then? As Kate DiCamillo would say: Reader, it is your destiny to find out.
With black-and-white illustrations and a refreshed cover by Timothy Basil Ering.
Kate DiCamillo lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She is the author of BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE, a Newbery Honor book, and THE TIGER RISING, which was a National Book Award Finalist. Kate DiCamillo says, "A few years ago, my best friend’s son asked me if I would write a story for him. ‘Well,’ I said, ‘I don’t normally write stories on comma...
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Title:The Tale Of Despereaux: Being The Story Of A Mouse, A Princess, Some Soup, And A Spool Of ThreadFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:272 pages, 7.63 × 5.2 × 0.74 inShipping dimensions:7.63 × 5.2 × 0.74 inPublished:December 8, 2015Publisher:Candlewick PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0763680893

ISBN - 13:9780763680893

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful read! I remember reading this as a kid in elementary school. After we were finished with it in class, I signed it out of the library and read it another 3 times! I'd recommend this book to any age, such a beautiful story and a great read.
Date published: 2018-08-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Still remember my fourth grade teacher reading this to the class! We all loved it!
Date published: 2018-07-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful and Heartwarming The Tale of Despereaux connects multiple fascinating stories, from well-developed characters with intriguing backstories, into a beautiful tale about a mouse that doesn't fit in, who strays from the norm but embraces it as he goes on a fantastical adventure. Everything fits together, with a beautiful, happy ending. A must-read for everyone of all ages!
Date published: 2018-07-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my childhood favourites Read this so many times as a kid and the story still holds up.
Date published: 2018-06-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from beautiful I read it as a kid, and I still reread it when I get the chance.... every kid needs to read this at least once in their life
Date published: 2018-03-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Truly beautiful story Read this when I was a kid and loved it. I couldn't put it down. Really beautiful story and characters.
Date published: 2017-10-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourite books! This is an amazingly interwoven story. It has great characters and teaches a beautiful message about forgiveness and the dangers of dwelling on revenge.
Date published: 2017-10-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic Book! One of my favourite Kate DiCamillo books. Teaches kids (and adults) about the importance of forgiveness and the dangers of dwelling on revenge through a beautiful heartwarming tale (pun intended).
Date published: 2017-10-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Charming! This is a really lovely children's book. I have found that everything written by Kate DiCamillo is exceptionally well-written, and this book is no exception!
Date published: 2017-08-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read This was a very nice story!
Date published: 2017-03-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Charming little book. It's been quite a long time since I've read this book but it was definitely charming and a cute little read. I very much enjoyed it!
Date published: 2017-03-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I love this little mouse! Kate Dicamillo is a charming writer, her books are always a treat #plumreview
Date published: 2017-02-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read Here's a mouse that I most definitely would not mind having.
Date published: 2016-12-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love It! Growing up, this was one of my favourite books to reread, over and over again. It is so cleverly written that your little one will love it so much.
Date published: 2016-12-03

From the Author

A brave mouse, a covetous rat, a wishful serving girl, and a princess named Pea come together in Kate DiCamillo's Newbery Medal–winning tale.Welcome to the story of Despereaux Tilling, a mouse who is in love with music, stories, and a princess named Pea. It is also the story of a rat called Roscuro, who lives in the darkness and covets a world filled with light. And it is the story of Miggery Sow, a slow-witted serving girl who harbors a simple, impossible wish. These three characters are about to embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other's lives. What happens then? As Kate DiCamillo would say: Reader, it is your destiny to find out. With black-and-white illustrations and a refreshed cover by Timothy Basil Ering.

Read from the Book

CHAPTER ONE: THE LAST ONEThis story begins within the walls of a castle, with the birth of a mouse. A small mouse. The last mouse born to his parents and the only one of his litter to be born alive."Where are my babies?" said the exhausted mother when the ordeal was through. "Show to me my babies."The father mouse held the one small mouse up high."There is only this one," he said. "The others are dead.""Mon Dieu, just the one mouse baby?""Just the one. Will you name him?""All of that work for nothing," said the mother. She sighed. "It is so sad. It is such the disappointment." She was a French mouse who had arrived at the castle long ago in the luggage of a visiting French diplomat. "Disappointment" was one of her favorite words. She used it often."Will you name him?" repeated the father."Will I name him? Will I name him? Of course, I will name him, but he will only die like the others. Oh, so sad. Oh, such the tragedy."The mouse mother held a handkerchief to her nose and then waved it in front of her face. She sniffed. "I will name him. Yes. I will name this mouse Despereaux, for all the sadness, for the many despairs in this place. Now, where is my mirror?"Her husband handed her a small shard of mirror. The mouse mother, whose name was Antoinette, looked at her reflection and gasped aloud. "Toulèse," she said to one of her sons, "get for me my makeup bag. My eyes are a fright."While Antoinette touched up her eye makeup, the mouse father put Despereaux down on a bed made of blanket scraps. The April sun, weak but determined, shone through a castle window and from there squeezed itself through a small hole in the wall and placed one golden finger on the little mouse.The other, older mice children gathered around to stare at Despereaux."His ears are too big," said his sister Merlot. "Those are the biggest ears I've ever seen.""Look," said a brother named Furlough, "his eyes are open. Pa, his eyes are open. They shouldn't be open."It is true. Despereaux's eyes should not have been open. But they were. He was staring at the sun reflecting off his mother's mirror. The light was shining onto the ceiling in an oval of brilliance, and he was smiling up at the sight."There's something wrong with him," said the father. "Leave him alone."Despereaux's brothers and sisters stepped back, away from the new mouse."This is the last," proclaimed Antoinette from her bed. "I will have no more mice babies. They are such the disappointment. They are hard on my beauty. They ruin, for me, my looks. This is the last one. No more.""The last one," said the father. "And he'll be dead soon. He can't live. Not with his eyes open like that."But, reader, he did live.This is his story.______THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Timothy Basil Ering. Text copyright (c) 2006 by Kate DiCamillo. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

Editorial Reviews

DiCamillo "sets the stage for a battle between the forces of Darkness and Light in THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX, and the book is a terrific, bravura performance."—New York Times Book Review, TheThe author of BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE and THE TIGER RISING here shifts gears, demonstrating her versatility while once again proving her genius for mining the universal themes of childhood. . . . I must tell you, you are in for a treat.—Publishers Weekly (starred review)A charming story of unlikely heroes . . . This expanded fairy tale is entertaining, heartening, and, above all, great fun.—School Library Journal (starred review)Forgiveness, light, love, and soup. These essential ingredients combine into a tale that is as soul stirring as it is delicious.—Booklist (starred review)The melodramatic voice of the narrator glides through DiCamillo's entirely pleasing tale . . . And so unwinds a tale with twists and turns, full of forbidden soup and ladles, rats lusting for mouse blood, a servant who wishes to be a princess, a knight in shining—or at least furry—armor, and all the ingredients of an old-fashioned drama.—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)There is a classic charm to this picaresque tale of an idealistic mouse suffering unrequited love for a princess; that and a pace that lends itself to reading aloud will make this novel a favorite among those ready for some gentle questing.—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, TheDiCamillo tells an engaging tale . . . Many readers will be enchanted by this story of mice and princesses, brave deeds, hearts 'shaded with dark and dappled with light,' and forgiveness.—Horn Book, TheSoul stirring and charming.—BooklistNewbery-Honor winning DiCamillo creates the perfect read-aloud with delightful, fanciful characters.—Child's Best of the YearThis old-fashioned tale is overflowing with good and evil, light and dark, scary adventures, and a happy ending. Ideally read aloud.—Nick Jr. Family Magazine Best Books of the YearHeart-stopping and heartwarming. . . . The perfect read-aloud.—San Francisco ChronicleChill winds call for hot cocoa and a good book. THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX serves up 52 chapters bursting with adventure.—Washington ParentI give this book the highest rating: five out of five stars.—NewsdayUnexpectedly complex in the relationships between its characters, DiCamillo's fable, engagingly illustrated by Timothy Basil Ering, delivers a carefully orchestrated, but not overstated, testament to the power of love and forgiveness.—San Francisco ChronicleDespereaux . . . stands shoulder to shoulder with such legendary literary mice as E.B. White's Stuart Little and Margery Sharp's Bernard and Miss Bianca."Reader, it is his destiny — just as it is for THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX to become another timeless classic in the once-upon-a-time genre.—Orlando SentinelThis charming adventure by the award-winning author of BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE is a story of love, courage and following your heart.—Detroit Free PressRead the book aloud. Few recent texts have been designed for that, with multiple plots ticking on, divided into 52 small chapters. And don't forget the coda, a tiny but deft apologia of the imagination.—Chicago TribuneThis charming fairy tale brims with delightful characters.—Cleveland Plain DealerHere once again, loss brings characters together, misfits find a place in the world, and darkness and light swirl together in a not easily divisible mix.—Star TribuneTHE TALE OF DESPEREAUX "has DiCamillo's modern sensibilities, her wry humor, and crystalline prose."—Miami HeraldThe story is just plain fun to read, but it also explores deeper and darker aspects of parent-child relations, including betrayal, the need for forgiveness and the power of love.—Houston ChronicleSUPER SUMMER READS: THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX by Kate DiCamillo. A smaller-than-usual mouse falls in love with music, stories, and a Princess named Pea.—Woman's DayA heartwarming and rewarding read, THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX cheers uniqueness, boos conformity, urges readers to overlook seeming differences, and inspires hope.—Teacher MagazineWith its old-fashioned, fairy tale qualities and whimsical pencil drawings by Timothy Basil Ering, the book is definitely a departure for DiCamillo, but one readers are sure to love.—Book Page. . . DiCamillo's new fantasy novel is charming, by turns sad, sweet, and mildly scary.—Voice of Youth AdvocatesSly style and brilliantly-crafted characters will reward the reader . . .—Five Owls, The