The Tawny One: Soma, Haoma, and Ayahuasca by Matthew ClarkThe Tawny One: Soma, Haoma, and Ayahuasca by Matthew Clark

The Tawny One: Soma, Haoma, and Ayahuasca

byMatthew Clark

Paperback | September 30, 2017

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The identity of the plant known as soma in ancient India and as haoma in the Zoroastrian tradition has, for around 250 years, exercised the wits and imagination of scores of scholars. This plant is praised in the highest terms-as a kind of deity-in both Zoroastrian and Vedic texts that date from around 1,700-1,500 BCE. It is said to provide health, power, wisdom, and even immortality. It has been variously identified by researchers as a nonpsychoactive plant, as a medicine, as merely water, as alcoholic, as a narcotic, as a stimulant, and as a psychedelic. Currently, the three most supported theories are that soma/haoma was either fly-agaric mushrooms, ephedra, or Syrian rue. The author suggests that the ritual drink was based on analogues of ayahuasca, using a variety of plants, some of which he identifies in the book.
Dr. Matthew Clark has spent many years in India and is currently a Research Associate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.
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Title:The Tawny One: Soma, Haoma, and AyahuascaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:295 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:September 30, 2017Publisher:Muswell Hill PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:190899522X

ISBN - 13:9781908995223

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The identity of the plant known asoma in ancient India and as haoma in the Zoroastrian tradition has, for around 250 years, exercised the wits and imagination of scores of scholars. This plant is praised in the highest terms-as a kind of deity-in both Zoroastrian and Vedic texts that date from around 1,700-1,500 BCE. It is said to provide health, power, wisdom, and even immortality. It has been variously identified by researchers as a nonpsychoactive plant, as a medicine, as merely water, as alcoholic, as a narcotic, as a stimulant, and as a psychedelic. Currently, the three most supported theories are that soma/haoma was either fly-agaric mushrooms, ephedra, or Syrian rue. The author suggests that the ritual drink was based on analogues of ayahuasca, using a variety of plants, some of which he identifies in the book.