The Textual Tradition of Euripides Orestes

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byJames Diggle

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Orestes, produced in 408 BC towards the end of Euripides' life, was one of the most popular Greek tragedies in antiquity, and was consequently preserved in a large number of medieval manuscripts. Having investigated about sixty of the most important, James Diggle explains the complicatedrelationships which exist among them. He also examines afresh the contribution of the papyri and quotations which preserve parts of the play. In the course of these analyses he throws much light on problems of text and interpretation, on metre, and on the activities of Byzantine scholars. This examination of Orestes is the last major task in the completion of the study of the Euripidean manuscript tradition. As such it will be indispensable to all students of the transmission of Greek tragedy.

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Orestes, produced in 408 BC towards the end of Euripides' life, was one of the most popular Greek tragedies in antiquity, and was consequently preserved in a large number of medieval manuscripts. Having investigated about sixty of the most important, James Diggle explains the complicatedrelationships which exist among them. He also e...

James Diggle is at University of Cambridge.

other books by James Diggle

Format:HardcoverDimensions:196 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.67 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019814766X

ISBN - 13:9780198147664

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'The detailed analysis of affiliations and multifarious linkages ... is handled with unimpeachable accuracy ... and clarity of presentation ... But we must be grateful to D. ... for providing so much of the evidence needed for further study in this field.'C.W. Willink, The Classical Review, 1992