The Theatres of War: Performance, Politics, and Society 1793-1815 by Gillian Russell

The Theatres of War: Performance, Politics, and Society 1793-1815

byGillian Russell

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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* Based on new research, and drawing on developments in literary and historical studies The Theatres of War reveals the importance of the theatre in the shaping of responses to the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars (1793-1815). Gillian Russell explores the roles of the army and navy as both actors and audiences, showing that theatricality was crucial to the self-perception of soldiersand sailors fighting on behalf of an often distant domestic audience.

About The Author

Gillian Russell, Lecturer in the Department of English, The Australian National University.
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Details & Specs

Title:The Theatres of War: Performance, Politics, and Society 1793-1815Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.01 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198122632

ISBN - 13:9780198122630

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`The Theatres of War is an admirable attempt to reclaim for the 'new' cultural history both military history and a now obscure literature ... Russell's book does not perhaps engage fully with the intricacies of the ideological conflict abroad in Britain during the French Revolution, but thebreadth of material she has unearthed, from the short-lived 'African Theatre' of the Cape Colony to the 'Aquatic Theatre' of Sadler's Wells, from the private theatricals of the elite to the spouting-clubs of the Plymouth docks, and the poise with which she manages it all, is ample compensation.'M.O. Grenby, University of Edinburgh, The Historical Association 1997