The Theory and History of Ocean Boundary-Making by Douglas M. JohnstonThe Theory and History of Ocean Boundary-Making by Douglas M. Johnston

The Theory and History of Ocean Boundary-Making

byDouglas M. Johnston

Hardcover | September 1, 1988

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In this book Douglas Johnston provides a synthesis of all disciplines relevant to any aspect of boundary-making. He outlines the general theory of boundary-making, reviews the modern history of all modes of boundary-making in the ocean, and provides a theoretical framework for the analysis and evaluation of ocean boundary claims, practices, arrangements, and settlements. The author suggests that as bilateral treaty-making continues, significant boundary delimitation patterns will emerge, some of which may prove useful in non-oceanic contexts of boundary-making and natural resource management such as Antarctica, airspace and outerspace, and international lakes and rivers.
Douglas Johnston was a member of the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria and holder of the chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations.
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Title:The Theory and History of Ocean Boundary-MakingFormat:HardcoverDimensions:464 pages, 9.2 × 6.3 × 1.6 inPublished:September 1, 1988

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773506241

ISBN - 13:9780773506244

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"deals with an extremely important question which many governments around the world have to grapple with...this book will stand in comparison with international scholarship." Armand DeMestral, Faculty of Law, McGill University "Johnston's chief contributons grow out of the truly impressive sysnthesis he has achieved. The breadth of literature reviewed and case law analysed...is outstanding...Johnston straddles the gulf between international law and political geography." Louis DeVorsey, Department of Geography, University of Georgia