The Transplanted: A History Of Immigrants In Urban America by John Bodnar

The Transplanted: A History Of Immigrants In Urban America

byJohn Bodnar

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"... an excellent broad overview... " -Journal of Social History

"... powerfully argued... " -Moses Rischin

"... imaginative and soundly based... " -Choice

"Highly recommended... " -Library Journal

"... an outstanding major contribution to the literature on immigration history." -History

"... a very important new synthesis of American immigration history... " -Journal of American Ethnic History

"... a state of the art discussion, impressively encyclopaedic... The Transplanted is a tour de force, and a fitting summation to Bodnar's own prolific, creative, and insightful writings on immigrants." -Journal of Interdisciplinary History

A major survey of the immigrant experience between 1830 and 1930, this book has implications for all students and scholars of American social history.

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Title:The Transplanted: A History Of Immigrants In Urban AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.9 inPublisher:Indiana University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:025320416X

ISBN - 13:9780253204165

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Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INTRODUCTION

1. THE HOMELAND AND CAPITALISM
The Structure of Emigration
The Spread of Commercial Agriculture
The Decline of the Craftsmen
Population Expansion
The Adaptive Household
Familiarity with Moving
The Pragmatic Mind of Emigrants
Conclusion

2. FAMILIES ENTER AMERICA
Networks of Migration
The Rise of the Family Economy
Conclusion

3. WORKERS, UNIONS, AND RADICALS

Imported Traditions of Work and Protest
Ethnic Diversity and American Unions
Immigrants and Socialism
The Immigrant Working Class and the 1930s
Conclusion

4. THE RISE OF AN IMMIGRANT MIDDLE CLASS
Divided Communities
The Fraternal Movement and Early Enterprise
Immigrant Entrepreneurs
The New Middle Class
Conclusion

5. CHURCH AND SOCIETY
The Role of the Church
Class, Culture, and the Church
Competing Leaders
Conclusion

6. IMMIGRANTS AND THE PROMISE OF AMERICAN LIFE
Immigrants and Social Mobility
Passing Through the Ghetto
Immigrant Homeownership
Conclusion

7. AMERICA ON IMMIGRANT TERMS
Folklife and the Quest for Meaning
Selective Schooling Immigrant Politics
Conclusion

8. CONCLUSION: THE CULTURE OF EVERYDAY LIFE

APPENDIX
NOTES
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX