The Triune Brain In Evolution: Role In Paleocerebral Functions

Hardcover

byP.d. MacLean, P. D. Maclean

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The brains of advanced mammals comprise an interconnected amalgamation of three main analyzers that in their structure and chemistry reflect developments identified, respectively, with reptiles, early mammals, and late mammals. The main substance of MacLean's (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD) examination concerns comparative neurobehavioral and clinical studies related to evolutionary considerations of the structure, chemistry, and functions of the triune brain. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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From Our Editors

The main substance of the present book concerns comparative neurobehavioral and clinical studies germane to evolutionary considerations. Here the evidence, along with other considerations, seems to present an surmountable obstacle to our ever obtaining confidence in scientific or other intellectual beliefs---a confidence that is essent...

From the Publisher

The brains of advanced mammals comprise an interconnected amalgamation of three main analyzers that in their structure and chemistry reflect developments identified, respectively, with reptiles, early mammals, and late mammals. The main substance of MacLean's (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD) examination concerns...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:704 pages, 9.25 × 6.1 × 0 inPublisher:Springer

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0306431688

ISBN - 13:9780306431685

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From Our Editors

The main substance of the present book concerns comparative neurobehavioral and clinical studies germane to evolutionary considerations. Here the evidence, along with other considerations, seems to present an surmountable obstacle to our ever obtaining confidence in scientific or other intellectual beliefs---a confidence that is essential to make it worthwhile to pursue a search for the meaning of life. If the reader were able to contradict or circumvent the interpretations that have been reached in this respect, that would be a contribution of endless value.