The True Law of Kingship: Concepts of Monarchy in Early-Modern Scotland

Hardcover | January 1, 1996

byJ. H. Burns

not yet rated|write a review
`Fear God, honour the king'. Sixteenth-century people were supposed to do both. But what was the king entitled to command? And what if he ordered one thing and God's law said another? In this fascinating and original study, James Burns examines these questions by focusing on a neglectedarea of study: the Scottish experience. Sixteenth-century Scots lived through intense political and religious conflict, which generated a substantial literature of political debate. This debate was of such an intensity that James VI, the first king to rule over Scotland and England, wrote his ownbook on the subject: The True Lawe of Free Monarchies. Some of the substantial literature of political debate has long been recognized as important in the wider history of European political thought. Knox and Buchanan as exponents of 'resistance theory', Blackwood and Barclay as defenders of 'absolute' monarchy, have had that recognition. James VIuniquely expounding 'divine right' principles from the throne, has likewise had his place. More recently, the significance of the late-scholastic theory of John Mair has been increasingly acknowledged. This book, however, is the first attempt to bring together systematically these and lessfamiliar elements in a rich and varied body of political thought. The Scottish response to monarchical government not only provides a microcosmic view of European thinking on the subject, it also contributes substantially to our understanding of the Scottish element in the new `British' politywhich was emerging at the end of the period.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$295.43 online
$420.00 list price (save 29%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From Our Editors

'Fear God, honour the king.' Sixteenth-century people were supposed to do both. But what was the king entitled to command? And what if he ordered one thing and God's law said another? In this fascinating and original study, James Burns examines these questions by focusing on a neglected area of study: the Scottish experience. The sixte...

From the Publisher

`Fear God, honour the king'. Sixteenth-century people were supposed to do both. But what was the king entitled to command? And what if he ordered one thing and God's law said another? In this fascinating and original study, James Burns examines these questions by focusing on a neglectedarea of study: the Scottish experience. Sixtee...

J. H. Burns is a Professor Emeritus, History of Political Thought at University of London.

other books by J. H. Burns

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy

Mass Market Paperback|Oct 5 1999

$10.38 online$10.99list price(save 5%)
The Feeling Good Handbook: The Groundbreaking Program With Powerful New Techniques And Step-by-step…
The Feeling Good Handbook: The Groundbreaking Program W...

Paperback|May 1 1999

$20.63 online$35.00list price(save 41%)
The Moth Presents All These Wonders: True Stories About Facing The Unknown
The Moth Presents All These Wonders: True Stories About...

Hardcover|Mar 21 2017

$30.26 online$34.00list price(save 11%)
see all books by J. H. Burns
Format:HardcoverDimensions:332 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.94 inPublished:January 1, 1996Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198203845

ISBN - 13:9780198203841

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The True Law of Kingship: Concepts of Monarchy in Early-Modern Scotland

Reviews

Extra Content

From Our Editors

'Fear God, honour the king.' Sixteenth-century people were supposed to do both. But what was the king entitled to command? And what if he ordered one thing and God's law said another? In this fascinating and original study, James Burns examines these questions by focusing on a neglected area of study: the Scottish experience. The sixteenth century in Scotland was a time of intense political and religious conflict, which generated a substantial literature of political debate. This debate was of such intensity that James VI, the first king to rule over Scotland and England, wrote his own book on the subject: 'The True Lawe of Free Monarchies'. Some of the substantial literature of political debate has long been recognized as important in the wider history of European political thought. Knox and Buchanan as exponents of 'resistance theory', Blackwood and Barclay as defenders of 'absolute' monarchy, have had that recognition. James VI, uniquely expounding 'divine right' principles from the throne, has likewise had his place. More recently, the significance of the late

Editorial Reviews

`A subtle and thought-provoking account of a difficult problem and a fascinating period.'The Scotsman