The Twentieth-century Spanish American Novel by Raymond Leslie WilliamsThe Twentieth-century Spanish American Novel by Raymond Leslie Williams

The Twentieth-century Spanish American Novel

byRaymond Leslie Williams

Paperback | March 1, 2005

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Winner, A Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Book

Spanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, the desire to be "modern" is a constant preoccupation in twentieth-century Spanish American literature and thus a very useful lens through which to view the century's novels.

In this pathfinding study, Raymond L. Williams offers the first complete analytical and critical overview of the Spanish American novel throughout the entire twentieth century. Using the desire to be modern as his organizing principle, he divides the century's novels into five periods and discusses the differing forms that "the modern" took in each era. For each period, Williams begins with a broad overview of many novels, literary contexts, and some cultural debates, followed by new readings of both canonical and significant non-canonical novels. A special feature of this book is its emphasis on women writers and other previously ignored and/or marginalized authors, including experimental and gay writers. Williams also clarifies the legacy of the Boom, the Postboom, and the Postmodern as he introduces new writers and new novelistic trends of the 1990s.

Raymond Leslie Williams is Distinguished Professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of California, Riverside. His previous publications include The Writings of Carlos Fuentes, The Postmodern Novel in Latin America, and The Colombian Novel, 1844–1987.
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Title:The Twentieth-century Spanish American NovelFormat:PaperbackDimensions:280 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.5 inPublished:March 1, 2005Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292706707

ISBN - 13:9780292706705

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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I: The Literary Tradition and Modern Science, 1900-1921
    • Chapter 1. Novelistic and Cultural Contexts at the Turn of the Century
    • Chapter 2. Rereading Spanish American Classics
  • Part II: Traditional and Modernist Aesthetics, 1922-1940
    • Chapter 3. Novelistic and Cultural Contexts in the 1920s and 1930s
    • Chapter 4. Rereading Spanish American Criollista Classics
    • Chapter 5. Rereading Novels of Vanguardia
  • Part III: The Rise of the Modernist Novel, 1941-1961
    • Chapter 6. Novelistic and Cultural Contexts of Latin American Modernism
    • Chapter 7. Rereading Spanish American Modernist Novels
  • Part IV: Modern and Cosmopolitan Works, 1962-1967
    • Chapter 8. Novels and Contexts of the Boom and Beyond
    • Chapter 9. Rereading Novels of the Boom
    • Chapter 10. Rereading the Spanish American Novel beyond the Boom
  • Part V: Toward a Postboom, Feminist, and Postmodern Novel, 1968-1999
    • Chapter 11. Novelistic and Cultural Contexts in the 1970s and 1980s
    • Chapter 12. Rereading the Spanish American Novel of the 1970s and 1980s
    • Chapter 13. Modern, Postmodern, and Transnational: The Latin American Novel in the 1990s
  • Notes
  • Bibliography

Editorial Reviews

Winner, A Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic BookSpanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, the desire to be "modern" is a constant preoccupation in twentieth-century Spanish American literature and thus a very useful lens through which to view the century's novels.In this pathfinding study, Raymond L. Williams offers the first complete analytical and critical overview of the Spanish American novel throughout the entire twentieth century. Using the desire to be modern as his organizing principle, he divides the century's novels into five periods and discusses the differing forms that "the modern" took in each era. For each period, Williams begins with a broad overview of many novels, literary contexts, and some cultural debates, followed by new readings of both canonical and significant non-canonical novels. A special feature of this book is its emphasis on women writers and other previously ignored and/or marginalized authors, including experimental and gay writers. Williams also clarifies the legacy of the Boom, the Postboom, and the Postmodern as he introduces new writers and new novelistic trends of the 1990s."Williams is among the very few scholars who are capable of producing such a sweeping perspective. . . . This study will be useful to specialized and non-specialized readers alike. For the latter, it provides a full grasp of the literary production coming out of Latin America during the entire twentieth century." - Dick Gerdes, Professor of Spanish and Chair of Foreign Languages, University of Las Vegas