The Two Books Of Francis Bacon; Of The Proficience And Advancement Of Learning [ed. By T. Markby].

Paperback | May 15, 2012

byFrancis Bacon

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 Excerpt: ...Timae. iii. 69, sej. » Tao. Ann. xvi. 18. 106 Medicine an Art mainly empiric, To speak therefore of Medicine, and to resume that we have said, ascending a little higher: the ancient opinion that man was microcosmus, au abstract or model of the world, hath been fantastically strained by Paracelsus and the alchemists, as if there were to be found in man's body certain correspondences and parallels, which should have respect to all varieties of things, as stars, planets, minerals, which are extant in the great world. But thus much is evidently true, that of all substances which nature hath produced, man's body is the most extremely compounded. For we see herbs and plants are nourished by earth and water; beasts for the most part by herbs and fruits; man by the flesh of beasts, birds, fishes, herbs, grains, fruits, water, and the manifold alterations, dressings, and preparations of the several bodies, before they come to be his food and aliment. Add hereunto, that beasts have a more simple order of life, and less change of affections to work upon their bodies: whereas man in his mansion, sleep, exercise, passions, hath infinite variations: and it cannot be denied but that the body of man of all other things is of the most compounded mass. The soul on the other side is the simplest of substances, as is well expressed: Purumque reliquit yEthereum sensum atque aurai simplicis iguem. So that it is no marvel though the soul so placed enjoy no rest, if that principle be true, that Motus rerum est rapidus extra locum, placidus in loco. But to the purpose: this variable composition of man's body hath made it as an instrument easy to distemper; and therefore the poets did well to conjoin music and medicine in Apollo,' because the office of medicine is but to tune t...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 Excerpt: ...Timae. iii. 69, sej. » Tao. Ann. xvi. 18. 106 Medicine an Art mainly empiric, To speak therefore of Medicine, and to resume that...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:86 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.18 inPublished:May 15, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217614868

ISBN - 13:9780217614863

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