The Unfortunate Traveller And Other Works

Paperback | May 30, 1972

byThomas NasheIntroduction byJ. B. SteaneEditorJ B Steane

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"Pamphleteer, poet, story-teller, satirist, scholar, moralist and jester . . ."

Thomas Nashe, a contemporary of Shakespeare, was writing in the 1590s, the zenith of the English Renaissance. Rebellious in spirit, conservative in philosophy, Nashe's brilliant and comic invective earned him a reputation as the "English Juvenal" who "carried the deadly stockado in his pen." In its mingling of the devout and bawdy, scholarship and slang, its brutality and its constant awareness of the imminence of death, his work epitomizes the ambivalence of the Elizabethans. Above all, Nashe was a great entertainer, "his stories are told for pleasure in telling, his jokes are cracked for the fun of them, and his whole style speaks of a relish for living."

In addition to The Unfortunate Traveller, this volume contains Pierce Penniless, The Terrors of the Night,Lenten Stuff and The Choice of Valentines, and extracts from Christ's Tears over Jerusalem, The Anatomy of Absurdity, and other works.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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From Our Editors

Shakespearean contemporary Thomas Nashe wrote in the 1590s, the height of the English Renaissance. A poet and pamphleteer, storyteller and satirist, moralist and humourist, Nashe had a unique zest for life. Spiritually rebellious, philosophically conservative, his brilliant and comic work captured the Elizabethan ambivalence. The U...

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"Pamphleteer, poet, story-teller, satirist, scholar, moralist and jester . . ."Thomas Nashe, a contemporary of Shakespeare, was writing in the 1590s, the zenith of the English Renaissance. Rebellious in spirit, conservative in philosophy, Nashe's brilliant and comic invective earned him a reputation as the "English Juvenal" who "carrie...

Thomas Nashe (1567-?) was born in Lowestoft, the son of a minister, and in 1573 the family moved to West Harling, near Thetford. There is no record of Nashe's schooling but in 1581 or 1582 he entered St. John's College, Cambridge, where he became a Lady Margaret scholar, receiving his B.A. in 1586. He left the University in 1588 and ...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:512 pages, 7.79 × 5.09 × 0.95 inPublished:May 30, 1972Publisher:Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140430679

ISBN - 13:9780140430677

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From Our Editors

Shakespearean contemporary Thomas Nashe wrote in the 1590s, the height of the English Renaissance. A poet and pamphleteer, storyteller and satirist, moralist and humourist, Nashe had a unique zest for life. Spiritually rebellious, philosophically conservative, his brilliant and comic work captured the Elizabethan ambivalence. The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works reveals his talent for combining the pious and perverse, the scholarly and colloquial. A superb entertainer, Nashe created engaging stories filled with humour and liveliness. This Penguin Classic edition includes “Pierce Penniless,” “The Terrors of the Night,” and “The Choice of Valentines,” as well as excerpts from “The Anatomy of Absurdity.”