The Voice On The Radio by Caroline B. CooneyThe Voice On The Radio by Caroline B. Cooney

The Voice On The Radio

byCaroline B. Cooney

Paperback | May 22, 2012

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In the vein of psychological thrillers like We Were Liars, Girl on the Train, and Beware That Girl, bestselling author Caroline Cooney’s JANIE series delivers on every level. Mystery and suspense blend seamlessly with issues of family, friendship and love to offer an emotionally evocative thrill ride of a read.


The kidnapping is long past, and the Johnsons and the Springs are on the way to restoring their lives. Janie is ever grateful to her devoted boyfriend who helped her through it all. As Janie tries to balance herself between the two families, she feels torn. It seems the only thing keeping her together is her love for Reeve, but he is away at college and Janie misses him terribly. 

For Reeve, college life seems overwhelming. And as a first-time disc jockey at his college radio station, he is discovering that dead air can kill you. To fill the silence, he finds himself spilling Janie's story over the airwaves. Reeve is so sure that Janie will never find out what's making his broadcast such a hit that he doesn't stop himself. What will be the price for Janie?
CAROLINE B. COONEY is the bestselling author of more than 30 young adult books, including the million-copy plus bestseller, The Face on the Milk Carton.
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Title:The Voice On The RadioFormat:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.49 inPublished:May 22, 2012Publisher:Random House Children's BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0385742401

ISBN - 13:9780385742405

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ahh I remember Reeve Hah! I remember the feeling of the initial betrayal that Janie felt when Reeve talked about her story over the radio. xD
Date published: 2017-04-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Like a walk back to my childhood Reread the books after not reading them since junior high. Still pretty good!
Date published: 2014-05-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from OK pretty sure I know what... ... really happened. Who kidnapped Janie? Yes, yes. It's in that folder.
Date published: 2013-10-09

Read from the Book

Derek Himself stared incredulously. Cal, a deejay, and Vinnie, the station manager, who were the other two guys at the station tonight, looked up from their paperwork. All three began to snicker, and then actually to snort, with laughter, although background noise was forbidden when the mike was on; it would be picked up and broadcast. Once upon a time? A beginning for kindergartners. A beginning for fairy tales and picture books.Reeve would never live it down. He really would have to transfer.He pictured Cordell laughing at him. Laughed at by a roommate stupider and smellier than anybody on campus? He imagined the guys in the dorm yelling Loser! Loser! Guys he wanted to be friends with but hadn't pulled it off yet. Guys who would not be polite about how worthless Reeve was."Once upon a time," he repeated helplessly, stuck in horrible repetition of that stupid phrase.And then talk arrived, like a tape that had come in the mail. For Reeve Shields really did know a story that began with "Once upon a time.""I dated a dizzy redhead. Dizzy is a compliment. Janie was light and airy. Like hope and joy. My girlfriend," he said softly, into the microphone. Into the world."You know the type. Really cute, fabulous red hair, lived next door. Good in school, of course, girls like that always are. Janie had lots of friends and she was crazy about her mom and dad, because that's the kind of family people like that have."Never had Reeve's voice sounded so rich and appealing."Except," said Reeve, "except one day in the school cafeteria, a perfectly ordinary day, when kids were stealing each other's desserts and spilling each other's milk, Janie just happened to glance down at the picture of that missing child printed on the milk carton."His slow voice seemed to draw a half-pint of milk, with its little black-and-white picture of a missing child. It was almost visible, that little milk carton, that dim and wax-covered photograph."And the face on the milk carton," said Reeve, "was Janie herself."He deepened his voice, moving from informative into mysterious. "They can't fit much information on the side of a half-pint," said Reeve, "but the milk carton said that little girl had been missing since she was three. Missing for twelve years."In radio, you could not see your audience. Reeve could not know whether he really did have an audience. Radio was faith."Can you imagine if your daughter, or your sister, had disappeared twelve years ago? Twelve years have gone by, and yet you still believe. Surely somehow, somewhere, she must be waiting, and listening. You haven't given up hope. You refuse to admit she's probably dead by now, probably was dead all along. You believe there is a chance in a million that if you put her picture on a milk carton, she'll see it."Beyond the mike, Reeve imagined dormitories--kids slouched on beds and floors, listening. Listening to him."Well," said Reeve, "she saw it."From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for The Voice on the Radio:*"Cooney's outstanding command of emotional tension has taken this novel to extraordinary heights."--School Library Journal, starred review*"Readers of Cooney's addictive The Face on the Milk Carton and Whatever Happened to Janie? can start licking their chops."--Publishers Weekly, starred review*"A 'must purchase' .  .  .  .  The Voice on the Radio elicits a powerful response in readers and is a real page-turner, so plan to purchase multiple copies to satisfy the demands of your teen readers."--Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)Also by Caroline B.  Cooney:The Face on the Milk Carton is an IRA-CBC Children's Choice book, and Whatever Happened to Janie? was selected as an ALA Best Book for Young Adults.From the Paperback edition.