The Wapshot Chronicle by John CheeverThe Wapshot Chronicle by John Cheever

The Wapshot Chronicle

byJohn Cheever

Paperback | June 28, 2011

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When The Wapshot Chronicle was published in 1957, John Cheever was already recognized as a writer of superb short stories. But The Wapshot Chronicle, which won the 1958 National Book Award, established him as a major novelist.

Based in part on Cheever’s adolescence in New England, the novel follows the destinies of the impecunious and wildly eccentric Wapshots of St. Botolphs, a quintessential Massachusetts fishing village. Here are the stories of Captain Leander Wapshot, venerable sea dog and would-be suicide; of his licentious older son, Moses; and of Moses’ adoring and errant younger brother, Coverly. Tragic and funny, ribald and splendidly picaresque, The Wapshot Chronicle is a family narrative in the tradition of Trollope, Dickens, and Henry James.

John Cheever, is the author of seven collections of stories and five novels. In 1965 he received the Howells Medal for Fiction from the National Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 1978 The Stories of John Cheever won the National Book Critics Award and the Pulitzer Prize. Shortly before his death in 1982, he was awarded the National M...
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Title:The Wapshot ChronicleFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.83 inPublished:June 28, 2011Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0060528877

ISBN - 13:9780060528874

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love it There's something about this novel that really struck a chord with me. As good if not better than his best stories.
Date published: 2017-01-22

Editorial Reviews

(Praise for The Wapshot Scandal)“A delectable and glorious piece of fiction…it paints our country as an earthly paradise, but a paradise full of evil, inhabited by more serpents than one.” (Glenway Wescott)