The War in Words: Reading the Dakota Conflict through the Captivity Literature by Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-stodolaThe War in Words: Reading the Dakota Conflict through the Captivity Literature by Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-stodola

The War in Words: Reading the Dakota Conflict through the Captivity Literature

byKathryn Zabelle Derounian-stodola

Hardcover | May 1, 2009

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The War in Words is the first book to study the captivity and confinement narratives generated by a single American war as it traces the development and variety of the captivity narrative genre. Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola examines the complex 1862 Dakota Conflict (also called the Dakota War) by focusing on twenty-four of the dozens of narratives that European Americans and Native Americans wrote about it. This six-week war was the deadliest confrontation between whites and Dakotas in Minnesota’s history. Conducted at the same time as the Civil War, it is sometimes called Minnesota’s Civil War because it was—and continues to be—so divisive.
 
The Dakota Conflict aroused impassioned prose from participants and commentators as they disputed causes, events, identity, ethnicity, memory, and the all-important matter of the war’s legacy. Though the study targets one region, its ramifications reach far beyond Minnesota in its attention to war and memory. An ethnography of representative Dakota Conflict narratives and an analysis of the war’s historiography, The War in Words includes new archival information, historical data, and textual criticism.
Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola is a professor of English and the director of the William G. Cooper Jr. Honors Program in English at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. She is the editor of Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives and the coauthor of The Indian Captivity Narrative, 1550–1900.
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Title:The War in Words: Reading the Dakota Conflict through the Captivity LiteratureFormat:HardcoverDimensions:398 pages, 9.03 × 6.3 × 1.2 inPublished:May 1, 2009Publisher:UNP - NebraskaLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803213700

ISBN - 13:9780803213708

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Reviews

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Preface

List of Narratives and Their Chronological Contexts

Methodology

Historical Perspectives on the Dakota War

 

Part 1. European Americans Narrating Captivity

Introduction

1. Martha Riggs Morris and Sarah Wakefield: Captivity and Protest

2. Harriet Bishop McConkey and Isaac Heard: Captivity and Early Dakota War Histories

3. Edward S. Ellis: Captivity and the Dime Novel Tradition

4. Mary Schwandt Schmidt and Jacob Nix: Captivity and German Americans

5. Jannette DeCamp Sweet, Helen Carrothers Tarble, Lillian Everett Keeney, and Urania White: Captivity and the Antiquarian Impulse

6. Benedict Juni: Captivity and the Boy's Adventure Story

 

Part 2. Native Americans Narrating Captivity

Introduction

7. Samuel J. Brown and Joseph Godfrey: Captivity and Credit

8. Paul Mazakutemani: Captivity and Spiritual Autobiography

9. Cecelia Campbell Stay and Nancy McClure Faribault Huggan: Captivity and Bicultural Women's Identity

10. Big Eagle, Lorenzo Lawrence, and Maggie Brass: Captivity and Cultural Stereotypes

11. Good Star Woman: Captivity and Ethnography

12. Esther Wakeman and Joseph Coursolle: Captivity and Oral History

13. Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve: Captivity and Counter Captivity

 

Conclusion: Captive to the Past? The Legacy of the Dakota War

Notes

Works Cited

Index

Editorial Reviews

"Drawing on an exhaustive list of printed histories, personal narratives, contemporary perspectives, oral histories, and even fiction, Derounian-Stodola in The War in Words has written a compelling, thorough, and admirably inclusive history of the Dakota conflict."—Journal of American Ethnic History
- Rebecca Blevins Faery - Journal of American Ethnic History - 20120227