The War of the Worlds

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The War of the Worlds

by Mary Ann Evans

Random House Children's Books | August 13, 1991 | Trade Paperback

The War of the Worlds is rated 3.7143 out of 5 by 7.
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of H. G. Wells's famous novel about a Martian invasion. To celebrate, we are reissuing our adaptation of this sci-fi classic with brand-new cover art.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 96 pages, 7.26 × 5.19 × 0.28 in

Published: August 13, 1991

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0679810471

ISBN - 13: 9780679810476

Appropriate for ages: 6 - 8

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Graphic Retelling of a Classic Reason for Reading: I enjoy graphic adaptations of the classics. It's been a few decades since I've read this original book and about time for a reread and this graphic adaptation makes me want to revisit the original. As all Campfire Classics the book is set up in the same format with a brief bio of the original author, then a main charachters page, followed by the book and ending with a two page spread with further info on the topic and time period of the books content./when it was written. I enjoyed the graphics, they were up to par with Campfire's usual realistic historical era drawings. I appreciated how the illustrations showed many pictures of the Martians but never really gave a clear detailed close-up, leaving something to the imagination at all times. They were often in the background or surrounded by mist or debris. When up close they were in shadows, surrounded by laser beams, debris, etc. An unusual device. The story as far as I can remember back to the original and given Campfire's previous record, seems to have stayed close to the original. One of Wells' better books and still relevant today, though we would have to change the planet Mars to another to make the story more viable.
Date published: 2011-09-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Arguably his best book, H.G. Wells has portrayed and painted a vivid image in reader's minds what an invasion from Mars would be like. This book is a must for lovers of science fiction classics. I believe that this book will linger in peoples dreams as it has on mine. The only fault H.G. Wells made in this book was make the triumphant victory of mankind too abrupt. On one page the Martians have destroyed London, and the next they are all dead from bacteria. Although this little abruptness in the story in which i find slightly disturbing, I recommend strongly this book to everyone.
Date published: 2010-06-08
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Repetitive and boring How could any writer take a subject as potentially thrilling as an invasion from Mars and turn it into such tedious and dull blather? He repeats the same descriptions over and over until you can't wait for it to end. This is one of the few instances in which the movie far outdoes the book.
Date published: 2010-02-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great sci-fi classic! It even made it to the big screen! A great sci-fi by H.G. Wells (The Invisible man, The Time Machine) it's exciting and interesting. For the age that this book was written, you can tell Wells had a huge imagination. It even brought America in panic when it was cited over a radio station. Now that's what I call a good book!
Date published: 2008-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Sci-fi throwback This earliest of sci-fi novels is a classic precursor to alien invasion stories, on paper or on film. I’m not too into science-fiction, but I have read Harry Turtledove’s World War series as I’m more of a military history buff. If you enjoy War of the Worlds or even if you find it a little antiquated for your tastes, you should definitely check out Turtledove’s work as he takes the theme to a whole new level. Having been written almost a century ago, this novel reads very well and the actual writing does not appear dated. (No “thee’s” and “thou’s” a la Shakespeare). Perhaps an interesting novel for younger readers, but they may scoff at the antiquated notion of Martian invaders, death rays, and the like. These have now become cliché, but have their origins with this book. The story is interesting and well written. I have not seen the recent movie, but rest assured it is not like the book, which is set in late 19th century England. An easier and lighter read than many other classics in English literature, I’m glad to have picked it up and would recommend it to readers of all ages.
Date published: 2005-12-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Pretty good altough the general story presented was fairly good i found it a difficult read and found that it dregged on and on with details
Date published: 2005-05-26
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Scarily Creepily Wonderful! «H.G. Wells» Is an amazing writer, and with War Of The Worlds, his writing continues to amaze readers!
Date published: 2004-12-31

– More About This Product –

The War of the Worlds

The War of the Worlds

by Mary Ann Evans

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 96 pages, 7.26 × 5.19 × 0.28 in

Published: August 13, 1991

Publisher: Random House Children's Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0679810471

ISBN - 13: 9780679810476

Read from the Book

Book One:The Coming of the MartiansChapter 1The Eve of the War No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinized and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinize the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.The planet Mars, I scarcely need remind the reader, revolves about the sun at a mean distance of 140,000,0
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From the Publisher

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of H. G. Wells's famous novel about a Martian invasion. To celebrate, we are reissuing our adaptation of this sci-fi classic with brand-new cover art.

From the Jacket

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of H. G. Wells's famous novel about a Martian invasion. To celebrate, we are reissuing our adaptation of this sci-fi classic with brand-new cover art.

About the Author

Arthur C. Clarke has long been considered the greatest science fiction writer of all time. Books by Clarke—both fiction and nonfiction—have sold more than a hundred million copies worldwide. He died in 2008.

From Our Editors

As life on Mars becomes impossible, Martians and their terrifying machines invade the earth.

Editorial Reviews

“The creations of Mr. Wells . . . belong unreservedly to an age and degree of scientific knowledge far removed from the present, though I will not say entirely beyond the limits of the possible.” —Jules Verne

Bookclub Guide

1. In 1878 the Italian astronomer Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli used the most advanced telescope of his day to map the surface of Mars. He discovered a number of dark, thin lines crisscrossing the planet and assumed that they were water channels?in Italian, canali. This was mistranslated into English as canals; as a result of this subtle linguistic error, many people in Britain and America believed these passages were man-made. It was in such an atmosphere of misunderstanding and scientific speculation that Wells published The War of the Worlds. Today, however, we know a great deal about Mars and the possibility of life there. Does our scientific knowledge of what is on Mars make the novel any less alarming? Why or why not?

2. Isaac Asimov has argued that The War of the Worlds can be read as an argument against British colonialism and the cold expansion of the empire. ?H. G. Wells must have wanted to write his book in such a way as to demonstrate the evils of [colonialism],? Asimov writes. ?He must have tried to show his own countrymen what they were doing to the world. The British had been in the forefront of the imperialistic drive, and by the end of the 1800?s, the British Empire included a quarter of the land area and the population of the world. . . . It seemed only poetic justice then that the Martian invasion in The War of the Worlds fell upon the British.? Do you agree with Asimov?s reading?

3. Wells begins the book with the chilling image of alien life watching over the earth. He describes the Martians as planning their attacks on an unsuspecting man with ?intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic.? How does this image resonate today?

4. Shortly before Wells died in 1946, he said, ?Reality has taken a leaf from my book and set itself to supersede me.? What does Wells mean by this?

5. When the Martians first land on earth, the people who encounter them initially treat the incident lightly, as if the aliens are a traveling amusement. Is this a realistic response? What do you think Wells is trying to say by this?

6. How does Wells use language and narrative style to create suspense and a sense of terror? Is the book frightening?

7. Many people consider The War of the Worlds the greatest science fiction book of all time. Do you agree? Why or why not? What other books are among the best? What defines a classic of science fiction?

Appropriate for ages: 6 - 8