The War That Ended Peace: The Road To 1914

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The War That Ended Peace: The Road To 1914

by Margaret Macmillan

Penguin Canada | July 29, 2014 | Trade Paperback

The War That Ended Peace: The Road To 1914 is rated 5 out of 5 by 1.
The First World War followed a period of sustained peace in Europe during which people talked with confidence of prosperity, progress, and hope. But in 1914, Europe walked into a catastrophic conflict that killed millions, bled its economies dry, shook empires and societies to pieces, and fatally undermined Europe’s dominance of the world. It was a war that could have been avoided up to the last moment—so why did it happen? Beginning in the early nineteenth century and ending with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, award-winning historian Margaret MacMillan uncovers the huge political and technological changes, national decisions, and just as important, the small moments of human muddle and weakness that led Europe from peace to disaster. This masterful exploration of how Europe chose its path toward war will change and enrich how we see this defining moment in our history.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 784 pages, 9 × 6.03 × 2 in

Published: July 29, 2014

Publisher: Penguin Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 014317360X

ISBN - 13: 9780143173601

Found in: History

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from History is a lady. And the best history is a five-star lady. So many authors have trod their way to August 1914 that how could yet another route be special? Well, it has narrative power and a half-twist in perspective that makes it utterly spellbinding and fresh. Rather than look for the outbreak of war, Margaret MacMillan discovers the failure of peace. Because Sarajevo wasn't the first crisis Europe faced. There was Bosnia and Morocco and Fashoda and a half dozen more. Now dusty names for history students that could have had Sarajevo's infamy. But every time, the European powers found a way out. What went wrong this once? Fatalism, inevitability, peak antagonism, one crisis too many, ministers on holiday, and the idiosyncrasies and personal tragedies of the key actors. Take your pick, but really, don't ignore any of them. For such is history written, in the full woven garment instead of the single golden thread. Take her in the round with her infuriating follies and her glorious allures.
Date published: 2014-09-29

– More About This Product –

The War That Ended Peace: The Road To 1914

The War That Ended Peace: The Road To 1914

by Margaret Macmillan

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 784 pages, 9 × 6.03 × 2 in

Published: July 29, 2014

Publisher: Penguin Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 014317360X

ISBN - 13: 9780143173601

Read from the Book

Chapter 1Europe in 1900On April 14, 1900, Emile Loubet, the President of France, talked approvingly about justice and human kindness as he opened the Paris Universal Exposition. There was little kindness to be found in the press comments at the time. The exhibitions were not ready; the site was a dusty mess of building works; and almost everyone hated the giant statue over the entrance of a woman modeled on the actress Sarah Bernhardt and dressed in a fashionable evening dress. Yet the Exposition went on to be a triumph, with over 50 million visitors.In style and content the Exposition partly celebrated the glories of the past and each nation displayed its national treasures—whether paintings, sculptures, rare books or scrolls—and its national activities. So where the Canadian pavilion had piles of furs, the Finnish showed lots of wood, and the Portuguese decorated their pavilion with ornamental fish. Many of the European pavilions mimicked great Gothic or Renaissance buildings, although little Switzerland built a chalet. The Chinese copied a part of the Forbidden City in Beijing and Siam (today Thailand) put up a pagoda. The Ottoman Empire, that dwindling but still great state which stretched from the Balkans in southern Europe through Turkey to the Arab Middle East, chose a pavilion which was a jumble of styles, much like its own peoples who included Christians, Muslims and Jews and many different ethnicities. With colored tiles and bricks, arches, towers, Gothic windows, e
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From the Publisher

The First World War followed a period of sustained peace in Europe during which people talked with confidence of prosperity, progress, and hope. But in 1914, Europe walked into a catastrophic conflict that killed millions, bled its economies dry, shook empires and societies to pieces, and fatally undermined Europe’s dominance of the world. It was a war that could have been avoided up to the last moment—so why did it happen? Beginning in the early nineteenth century and ending with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, award-winning historian Margaret MacMillan uncovers the huge political and technological changes, national decisions, and just as important, the small moments of human muddle and weakness that led Europe from peace to disaster. This masterful exploration of how Europe chose its path toward war will change and enrich how we see this defining moment in our history.

About the Author

MARGARET MacMILLAN is the renowned author of Women of the Raj, Stephen Leacock (Extraordinary Canadians series), and the international bestsellers Nixon in China and Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World, which won the 2003 Governor General’s Award and the 2002 Samuel Johnson Prize. She is also the author of The Uses and Abuses of History. The past provost of Trinity College at the University of Toronto, she is now the warden of St. Antony’s College at Oxford University.

Editorial Reviews

“Evocative…. [MacMillan] lays out in superb detail the personalities of power … and the choices they made, or neglected to make, that contributed to the start of the war in August, 1914.” - The Globe and Mail“Thorough and highly readable.” - National Post“It is [MacMillan’s] commitment to storytelling and her insistence that ‘there are always choices’ that provides a welcome break from the passive voice of so many First World War tomes.” - Maclean’s“A richly textured account of the road to war…. Vivid.” - The Guardian (U.K.)“Splendidly well written—fluent, engaging, well-paced and, despite the grim subject, often entertaining.” - New Statesman“She writes prose like an Audi—purring smoothly along the diplomatic highway, accelerating effortlessly as she goes the distance. This is a ground-breaking book, decisively shifting the debate away from the hoary old question of Germany's war guilt. MacMillan's history is magisterial—dense, balanced and humane. The story of Europe's diplomatic meltdown has never been better told.” - Spectator“The Canadian historian laces The War That Ended Peace with deft character sketches and uses sources incisively…MacMillan escorts the reader skilfully through the military, diplomatic and political crises that framed the road to war from 1870 to 1914.” - FT“Excellent, elegantly written book…as fine an assessment of the reason peace failed as any yet written.” - Saul David“Margaret MacMillan, the author of Peacemakers, which won numerous prizes, is t
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