The Wars We Inherit: Military Life, Gender Violence, and Memory

Hardcover | April 30, 2010

byLori E. Amy

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Lori Amy is Associate Professor in the Department of Writing and Linguistics and Director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program at Georgia Southern University.

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Lori Amy is Associate Professor in the Department of Writing and Linguistics and Director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program at Georgia Southern University.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:216 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.8 inPublished:April 30, 2010Publisher:Temple University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1592139604

ISBN - 13:9781592139606

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments 
1. Introduction 
2. Frank and Sally 
3.The Hole Things Fall Into 
4. Forgetting and Re-membering Interlude I: On the Event without a Witness 
5. Re-membering II Interlude II : On Bearing Witness 
6. If I Should Die before I Wake Interlude III : On Bearing Witness to the Process of Witnessing 
7. The Pasts We Repeat I: Margaret Interlude IV : The Uncanny Return 
8. The Pasts We Repeat II : Jenny 
9. If Our First Language Is the Silence of Complicity, How Do We Learn to Speak? 
10. The Work of War Interlude V: On the Violence of Nations in the Violence of Homes 
11. Toward Re-membering a Future 
12. The Work of Love 
13. Conclusion 

References 
Web Sites 
Index

Editorial Reviews

“By making the figure of the child central to the story of this book, the author charts out a dazzling path showing us how to draw lines of connection between the routine violence of a militarization and the routine if bewildering violence of the home. There is no easy way to describe how the voice of the child left me wounded even as I say how grateful I am for the author’s courage and restraint.” —Veena Das, Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Anthropology and Professor of Humanities, Johns Hopkins University