The Widows' Might: Widowhood and Gender in Early British America by Vivian CongerThe Widows' Might: Widowhood and Gender in Early British America by Vivian Conger

The Widows' Might: Widowhood and Gender in Early British America

byVivian Conger

Hardcover | March 1, 2009

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In early American society, one’s identity was determined in large part by gender. The ways in which men and women engaged with their communities were generally not equal: married women fell under the legal control of their husbands, who handled all negotiations with the outside world, as well as many domestic interactions. The death of a husband enabled women to transcend this strict gender divide. Yet, as a widow, a woman occupied a third, liminal gender in early America, performing an unusual mix of male and female roles in both public and private life.

With shrewd analysis of widows’ wills as well as prescriptive literature, court appearances, newspaper advertisements, and letters, The Widows’ Might explores how widows were portrayed in early American culture, and how widows themselves responded to their unique role. Using a comparative approach, Vivian Bruce Conger deftly analyzes how widows in colonial Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Maryland navigated their domestic, legal, economic, and community roles in early American society.

Title:The Widows' Might: Widowhood and Gender in Early British AmericaFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:March 1, 2009Publisher:NYU PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0814716741

ISBN - 13:9780814716748

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Conger deftly traces the difficult negotiations these women faced as they struggled with both independence and dependence. Her thorough research as well as her broad geographic approach adds depth to her analysis and particular weight to her conclusions.”
-Lisa Wilson,author of Ye Heart of a Man: The Domestic Life of Men in Colonial New England