The Wild Book by Margarita EngleThe Wild Book by Margarita Engle

The Wild Book

byMargarita Engle

Paperback | January 7, 2014

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"A beautiful tale of perseverance." - Kirkus Reviews, starred review Fefa struggles with words. She has word blindness, or dyslexia, and the doctor says she will never read or write. Every time she tries, the letters jumble and spill off the page, leaping away like bullfrogs. How will she ever understand them? &nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp But her mother has an idea. She gives Fefa a blank book filled with clean white pages. "Think of it as a garden," she says. Soon Fefa starts to sprinkle words across the pages of her wild book. She lets her words sprout like seedlings, shaky at first, then growing stronger and surer with each new day. And when her family is threatened, it is what Fefa has learned from her wild book that saves them.
Margarita Engle  is the award-winning author of the Newbery Honor book  The Surrender Tree, as well as The Poet Slave of Cuba, Tropical Secrets, The Firefly Letters, and Hurricane Dancers . She lives with her husband in Northern California. Visit her at www.margaritaengle.com.  
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Title:The Wild BookFormat:PaperbackDimensions:144 pages, 7.63 × 5.13 × 0.36 inPublished:January 7, 2014Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0544022750

ISBN - 13:9780544022751

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful Book When my daughter was first diagnosed with dyslexia she had a low self esteem and felt like she was the only one with it no matter how much I told her she wasn't. She was 9. As soon as we started reading the book she started connecting with the main character. All through the book she kept saying that is like me, that is how I see things, and maybe I should start doing that. It was the first time she didn't feel alone because it is a true story. I can't say enough about this book but thank you to the writer!
Date published: 2017-01-25

Read from the Book

Word-Blindness Word-blindness.The doctor hisses itlike a curse.Word-blindness,he repeats—some childrencan see everythingexcept words.They are only blindon paper.Fefa will never be ableto read, or write,or be happyin school. Word-blindness.It sounds like an evil wizard’sprophecy, dangerousand dreadful,but Mamá does not listento the serpent voiceof the hissing doctor.She climbs in the wagon,clucks to the horse,and carries us hometo our beautiful green farm,where she tells me to followthe good example of Santa Mónica,patron saint of patience. Word-blindness,Mamá murmurswith a suffering sigh—whoever heard of such an impossibleburden? She refuses to acceptthe hissing doctor’s verdict.Seeds of learning grow slowly,she assures me.Then she lights a tall,slender candle,and gives mea book. I grow anxious.I pretend that my eyes hurt.I pretend that my head hurts,and pretty soonit is true. I know that the wordswant to trick me.The letters will jumbleand spill off the page,leaping and hopping,jumping far away,like slimybullfrogs. Think of this little bookas a garden,Mamá suggests.She says it so calmlythat I promise I will try. Throw wildflower seedsall over each page, she advises.Let the words sproutlike seedlings,then relax and watchas your wild diarygrows. I open the book.Word-blindness.The pages are white!Is this reallya blank diary,or just an ordinaryschoolbookfilled with frog-slipperytricky lettersthat know how to leapand escape?

Editorial Reviews

A Kirkus Best Children's Book of 2012A Bank Street College of Education Best Book* A beautiful tale of perseverance."- Kirkus Reviews, starred review"Readers will be enchanted."- VOYA "[A] lyrical glimpse of early twentieth-century Cuba."- Booklist "Engle's writing is customarily lovely."- Publishers Weekly "[A] remarkable, intimate depiction of Fefa's struggle with dyslexia; Engle is masterful at using words to evoke this difficulty, and even those readers unfamiliar with the condition will understand its meaning through her rich use of imagery and detail."- Bulletin "The idea of a wild book on which to let her words sprout is one that should speak to those with reading difficulties and to aspiring poets as well."- School Library Journal "