The Wild Boy of Aveyron by Harlan LaneThe Wild Boy of Aveyron by Harlan Lane

The Wild Boy of Aveyron

byHarlan Lane

Paperback | May 16, 1979

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Using original documents, historical accounts and scientific writings, the author recreates a legendary story. The Wild Boy of Aveyron tells the unique case of a young boy who lived alone in the forest until his capture. Readers learn about the different theories that came out of his experience and why the story is important to the education of disadvantaged children.
Title:The Wild Boy of AveyronFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 8.75 × 6.35 × 0.68 inPublished:May 16, 1979Publisher:Harvard

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0674953002

ISBN - 13:9780674953000

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Using original documents, historical accounts and scientific writings, the author recreates a legendary story. The Wild Boy of Aveyron tells the unique case of a young boy who lived alone in the forest until his capture. Readers learn about the different theories that came out of his experience and why the story is important to the education of disadvantaged children.

Editorial Reviews

In 1800, the boy of the title was a child of perhaps twelve or thirteen who had been wandering alone in the mountainous forests of southern France for an unknown time before his capture. Like other children who have grown up without human contact, the lad, who was later named Victor, behaved in peculiar ways. Most importantly, he could not speak. Victor was discovered at a period when philosophical investigations into human nature had begun to affect medicine, psychology, and pedagogy. He was brought to Paris and turned over to a young doctor, Jean-Marc-Gaspard Itard...Dr. Lane tells us how a whole new kind of education descends from Itard's lifework--first, the training of the physically handicapped, then the training of the mentally retarded. (Before modern times, both kinds of people were regarded as useless and unteachable.) Finally, through Maria Montessori, Itard's concepts were applied to teaching ordinary youngsters, and Dr. Lane points out how his difficult discoveries have become everyday assumptions. His book is an exceptionally readable, intelligent monument to one of humanity's benefactors and to his successors, who carried on in Itard's spirit of scientific curiosity, kindness, and doggedness.