The World Of The Paris Café: Sociability Among The French Working Class, 1789-1914 by W. Scott HaineThe World Of The Paris Café: Sociability Among The French Working Class, 1789-1914 by W. Scott Haine

The World Of The Paris Café: Sociability Among The French Working Class, 1789-1914

byW. Scott Haine

Paperback | September 11, 1998

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In The World of the Paris Café, W. Scott Haine investigates what the working-class café reveals about the formation of urban life in nineteenth-century France. Café society was not the product of a small elite of intellectuals and artists, he argues, but was instead the creation of a diverse and changing working population. Making unprecedented use of primary sources—from marriage contracts to police and bankruptcy records—Haine investigates the café in relation to work, family life, leisure, gender roles, and political activity. This rich and provocative study offers a bold reinterpretation of the social history of the working men and women of Paris.

W. Scott Haine is a member of the faculty at Holy Names College in California and is the editor of the Social History of Alcohol Review.
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Title:The World Of The Paris Café: Sociability Among The French Working Class, 1789-1914Format:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:September 11, 1998Publisher:Johns Hopkins University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801860709

ISBN - 13:9780801860706

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From Our Editors

W. Scott Haine investigates what the working-class café reveals about the formation of urban life in 19th-century France in The World of the Paris Café. Café society was not the product of a small elite of intellectuals and artists, but the creation of a diverse and changing working population. Through the use of marriage contracts, police records, and financial records, Haine examines the café in relation to work, family life, leisure, gender roles, and political activity.

Editorial Reviews

[Haine invites the reader of The World of the Paris Café to step up to the serving counter of a nineteenth-century Parisian café to eavesdrop on the conversations and to observe the dynamics of this unique working-class establishment... These cafés were far more than places to eat and drink to the great majority of working-class Parisians, who also frequented such establishments seeking shelter from authorities, exchanging and developing and sometimes enacting their ideas.Haine investigates a topic which is crucial in its own right and which ties together many of the central issues which historians have been debating in recent years. He uses neighborhood cafés as a privileged position from which to observe not only drinking and masculine play but also class formation, political mobilization, prostitution, job hunting, and many other activities that were important components of popular culture. He makes noteworthy contributions to many of the debates because he can bring so much new information and so many new perspectives to bear.