The Writings In Prose And Verse Of Rudyard Kipling (volume 1); Plain Tales From The Hills by Rudyard KiplingThe Writings In Prose And Verse Of Rudyard Kipling (volume 1); Plain Tales From The Hills by Rudyard Kipling

The Writings In Prose And Verse Of Rudyard Kipling (volume 1); Plain Tales From The Hills

byRudyard Kipling

Paperback | January 11, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1899. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... THE GATE OF THE HUNDRED SORROWS If I can attain Heaven for a pice, why should you be envious? Opium Smoker's Proverb. This is no work of mine. My friend, Gabral Misquitta, the half-caste, spoke it all, between moonset and morning, six weeks before he died; and I took it down from his mouth as he answered my questions. So:-- It lies between the Coppersmith's Gully and the pipe-stem sellers' quarter, within a hundred yards, too, as the crow flies, of the Mosque of Wazir Khan. I don't mind telling any one this much, but I defy him to find the Gate, however well he may think he knows the City. You might even go through the very gully it stands in a hundred times, and be none the wiser. We used to call the gully, "The Gully of the Black Smoke," but its native name is altogether different of course. A loaded donkey couldn't pass between the walls; and, at one point, just before you reach the Gate, a bulged house-front makes people go along all sideways. It isn't really a gate, though. It's a house. Old Fung-Tching had it first five years ago. He was a boot-maker in Calcutta. They say that he murdered his wife there when he was drunk. That was why he dropped bazar-rum and took to the Black Smoke instead. Later on, he came up north and opened the Gate as a house where you could get your smoke in peace and quiet. Mind you, it was a pukka, respectable opium-house, and not one of those stifling, sweltering chandoo-khanas that you can find all over the City. No; the old man knew his business thoroughly, and he was most clean for a Chinaman. He was a one-eyed little chap, not much more than five feet high, and both his middle fingers were gone. All the same, he was the handiest man at rolling black pills I have ever seen. Never seemed to be touched by the Smoke, either; and ...
Title:The Writings In Prose And Verse Of Rudyard Kipling (volume 1); Plain Tales From The HillsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:74 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.15 inPublished:January 11, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217618782

ISBN - 13:9780217618786

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